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Thread: Poisons in Fantasy AGE

  1. #1
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    Poisons in Fantasy AGE

    Looking at the Assassin mentioned in the Fantasy Age Companion, I think there is still room for the DAGE Poison making rules:

    Poison-Making
    Classes: Mage, Rogue or Warrior
    Requirement: You must have the Intelligence (Brewing) focus.

    You’ve managed to survive the dangerous training required to make and use poisons and other useful but dangerous compounds.

    Novice: You know how to prepare poisons, and how to use them without danger to yourself. Choose two Novice poisons you know how to make from memory. You can brew other Novice poisons as you find and learn their recipes.

    Journeyman: You have learned how to prepare more effective and more dangerous—poisons. Choose two Journeyman poisons you know how to make from memory. You can brew other Journeyman poisons you find and learn their recipes.

    Master: You have learned how to prepare the deadliest poisons. Choose two Master poisons you know how to make from memory. You can brew other Master poisons as you find and learn their recipes.

    Novice Poisons (Buy Cost/Make Cost)

    Strong Poison (24 sp/8 sp)
    This herbal concoction can be known by many names, and created with hundreds of plants or essences of venoms. This poison acts as a Moderate hazard, inflicting 2d6 additional damage. A successful TN 13 Constitution (Stamina) test halves this extra damage.

    Hake's Dust (12 sp/4 sp)
    Originally used by the eponymous healer to help subdue and quiet wounded or troubled soldiers who were too much for him to handle, others have since come up with more sinister uses. This poison weakens the victim who suffers a –2 penalty to Strength until the end of the encounter or until they receive magical healing. A successful TN 11 Constitution (Stamina) test reduces this penalty to -1.

    Blackroot Extract (8 sp/ 2 sp
    Blackroot is a common and relatively harmless plant. Certain tribesman use a distillation made from its root bulbs to induce vivid hallucinations in which they seek mystic knowledge. When concentrated the substance can be used as a weapon. Those exposed to deathroot extract must make a TN 15 Constitution (Stamina or Drinking) test. Those who fail suffer hallucinations according to the Blackroot Hallucinations table below. The involuntary actions described last only for the victim’s next turn (15 seconds during which no other actions can be taken), but they continue to suffer disorienting minor hallucinations without mechanical effects for up to an hour.

    Blackroot Hallucinations

    1 Even the birds are mocking me! The character spends the next turn raving at and attacking something innocuous like a tree, barrel, wagon, shrub, or bird.
    2 Get it off! Get it off! Get it off! The character is convinced they are covered by bugs, leeches, snakes, or the like. They spend the next turn swatting at non-existent creepy-crawlies.
    3 You did this to me! The character believes one of their comrades has backstabbed them or is otherwise plotting their demise. On the next turn the character can only take the defend action and yell in outrage at their “betrayer.”
    4 The sky, the hideous sky! The character believes that some malign creature from the sky is about to carry them off (or, for dwarves or gnomes, that they are going to fall into the sky). The character spends their next turn dropping their weapons and grabbing something solid.
    5 The shadows are alive! The character is overcome with fear of the surrounding shadows, including their own. They spend the next turn running at top speed away from the closest concentration of shadows.
    6 Foul Demon! The character is suddenly convinced that a random nearby ally (determined by the GM) is a demon or other natural enemy. The character spends the next turn attacking that “enemy,” with a +1 bonus on attack rolls for their fervency.

    Spider Venom (12 sp/4 sp)
    Extracted from particularly deadly and venomous spiders, if the attack from an envenomed weapon hits, the poison slows and partially paralyes the victim, who suffers a –1 penalty to Dexterity, Fighting, and Accuracy until the end of the encounter or until they receive magical healing. A successful TN 11 Constitution (Stamina) test ignores these penalties.

    Journeyman Poisons

    Concentrated Poison (84 sp/28 sp)
    Going by a multitudes of names and comprised of several deadly ingredients, this poison acts as an Arduous hazard, inflicting 4d6 additional damage. A successful TN 15 Constitution (Stamina) test halves this extra damage.

    Fleshfell (96 sp/32 sp)
    Nasty stuff, Fleshfell causes a victim’s skin to immediately begin to slough off, which is horribly painful and grossly noxious. The poison acts as a Minor hazard, inflicting 1d6 additional damage. A successful TN 15 Constitution (Stamina) test halves this extra damage. If this test is failed, each round for 2d6 rounds a victim must make a TN 15 Constitution (Stamina) test at the beginning of their turn to overcome the pain. If they fail they can only take a minor action that turn. A –2 penalty to social tests where a disgusting appearance would be relevant persists for a number of days equal to the number of rounds the immediate effects persisted.

    Giant Spider Venom (72 sp/ 24 sp)
    Extracted from the massive arachnids, this poison can take the edge off a warrior’s skill. If the attack from an envenomed weapon hits, the poison slows and partially paralyes the victim, who suffers a –2 penalty to Dexterity, Fighting, and Accuracy until the end of the encounter or until they receive magical healing. A successful TN 13 Constitution (Stamina) test reduces these penalties to -1.

    Witchbane (96 sp/32 sp)
    Developed by an order of templars, this violet liquid is anathema to mages, draining their arcane energy. The target of this poison loses 2d6 Magic points, although a successful TN 13 Willpower (Self-Discipline) test halves this loss.

    Master Poisons

    Concentrated Witchbane (15 gp/5 gp)
    A more portent version of Witchbane, the target of this poison loses 4d6 Magic points, although a successful TN 15 Willpower (Self-Discipline) test halves this loss.

    Death's Kiss (24 gp/ 8 gp)
    A foul mixture of poisons infamous even in assassins’ circles, Death's Kiss kills instantaneously—or doesn’t, if (say the legends) its intended victim is destined for greater things. You may coat your dagger or throwing knife with this clear and odourless residue. The victim must make a TN 19 Constitution (Stamina) test, but also add their level to their roll (Adversaries add 4 per Threat level; Minor +4, Moderate +8, Major +12, Dire +16, Legendary +20). Those who succeed shrug off the effects but must still take 2d6 additional damage (treat this a moderate hazard). Those who fail fall immediately to 0 Health and soon expire according to the normal rules for dying. Attempts to stabilize victims of Death's Kiss suffer a –3 penalty.

    Manticore Venom (192 sp/64 sp)
    Extracted from the deadly manticore, this poison slows and partially paralyes the victim, who suffers a –3 penalty to Dexterity, Fighting, and Accuracy until the end of the encounter or until they receive magical healing. A successful TN 5 Constitution (Stamina) test reduces these penalties to -1.

    Bone Lock (18 gp/ 6 gp)
    This insidious poison runs ice through its victim’s limbs, all but locking them into place. The victim must make a a TN 15 Constitution (Stamina) test. If this test is failed the Bone lock’s victims can only take minor actions without consequence for the remainder of the encounter. To take a major action they must make a TN 15 Constitution (Stamina) test. On a success they suffer 1d6 penetrating damage and can carry out their action. On a failure they suffer 2d6 penetrating damage and can do nothing but howl in agony. Again, once the poison is used, it’s wiped of the weapon and must be re-applied, which takes one major action and one minor action to accomplish.

    Using Poisons
    Unless a given poison’s description says otherwise, poison can be inflicted on unfortunate victims either by ingestion or by coating a bladed weapon in the stuff and stabbing them with it. Those with the Poison-Making talent are able to use poisons in combat without endangering themselves or their allies. They’ve been taught how to avoid nicking themselves with toxic blades, and where best to stab and cut their enemies to ensure poisons do their work quickly and effectively. Those without that talent can try to use poisons, but run the risk of disaster
    when they do. When a character without the Poison-Making talent tries to coat a weapon with poison they must make a TN 13 Intelligence (Brewing) test. They suffer a –3 penalty if battle has already begun. If the test is failed, the poison does not coat the weapon and the character immediately suffers the poison's effects.

    You can coat a single melee weapon (from the Dueling, Light Blades, or Spears Groups) or three arrows/bolts by taking a Minor and a Major action. This uses up one dose of poison and once applied, a poison’s effectiveness last for the next successful attack (in the case of arrows or bolts, missed attacks are wasted). A single weapon may only be coated with a single type of poison at a time, and only with a single dose of the stuff. That is, doses can’t be “doubled up.”

    Learning Poisons
    All characters with the Poison-Making talent know how to make at least two poisons, and more are learned automatically as that talent is improved. However, most poisoners will seek to learn more recipes. To learn a new recipe a poisoner must find a teacher, which is generally either a poisoner of greater talent or a written record such as a book or scroll. Most high-level poisoners guard their knowledge jealously, paranoid that it will be used against them or will undermine a monopoly they enjoy in their homeland.

    Books are hard to find. Those not destroyed by the zealous are often held under lock and key. Where knowledge can be paid for—always and only at the GM’s discretion, and usually requiring an adventure on top of the cash price— Novice recipes cost 5–10 sp, Journeyman cost 1–10 gp, and Master recipes cost 10 gp or more. Given an appropriate source, learning a recipe requires an advanced TN 13 Intelligence (Brewing) test with a threshold of 15. Each test requires a day of study. Some sources of poison knowledge may be corrupted, partial, or dangerous as the GM sees fit. When learning a recipe from a source like this, the player must roll on the Poison Research Mishaps table each time they fail a test.

    Poison Research Mishaps
    d6 Roll Effect
    1–3 No additional danger.
    4–5 You suffer the regular effect and basic damage of the poison you’re trying to learn.
    6 You suffer the regular effect and double the basic damage of the poison you’re trying to learn.

    Preparing Poisons
    To prepare one or more doses of a poison requires knowledge of the appropriate recipe, the right raw materials, time to work and the raw ingredients (see above under Make Cost). These prices assume reasonable access to ready avenues of commerce, including black markets for the more dangerous poisons. The GM may always declare that certain poisons cannot be prepared in certain areas because the raw materials are simply not available there, and is free to require social tests for heroes who wish to acquire the ingredients for deadly poisons without attracting the attention of the local authorities.

    Player Characters can avoid paying (and attracting unwanted attention) by trying to harvest raw materials from the landscape. Harvesting one’s own ingredients requires an advanced Intelligence (Natural Lore) test with threshold 10 and a TN based on the class of the poison in question: TN 11 for Novice poisons, TN 15 for Journeyman poisons, and TN 19 for Master poisons. Each test takes a day of traveling the
    landscape. The GM is always free to rule that the ingredients of certain poisons are not available in a given area.

    Once the raw materials are in hand, preparing a dose of poison requires an advanced Intelligence (Brewing) test with threshold 10 and a TN based on the class of the poison in question: TN 13 for Novice poisons, TN 15 for Journeyman poisons, and TN 17 for Master poisons. Each test takes two hours (Novice poisons), four hours (Journeyman poisons), or 6 hours (Master poisons) with access to a private place and appropriate tools of the trade—burners, tubing, vessels, and so forth—in each case. A decent working setup costs 1 gp at the very least
    and is difficult to transport without damage. Superior and masterwork lab apparatuses cost a great deal more. On success, the test produces three doses of a Novice poison, two doses of a Journeyman poison, or one dose of a Master poison.

    The GM may rule that a character working with substandard or improvised equipment, tainted raw materials, or under chaotic conditions must roll on the Poison-Making Mishaps table each time they fail a production test, adding +1 to the roll if they’re working on a Journeyman poison or +2 if they’re working on a Master poison. Given potentially fatal outcomes, the GM should provide advance warning in circumstances where failure will warrant use of the mishaps table.

    Poison-Making Mishaps
    d6 Roll Effect
    1–3 No additional danger.
    4–5 You suffer the regular effect and basic damage of the poison you’re trying to prepare.
    6 You suffer the regular effect and double the basic damage of the poison you’re trying to prepare, and your tools are damaged or destroyed (GM’s option which one).
    7+ You die and your tools are destroyed.
    Last edited by Phantomdoodler; 03-15-2018 at 08:58 AM.

  2. #2
    OPA Belta
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    Re: Poisons in Fantasy AGE

    2 main things:

    1. Any save or die is just tempting fate.

    2. The action economy doesn't make sense. You're better off just attacking.

  3. #3
    Protomolecule Host
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    Re: Poisons in Fantasy AGE

    Quote Originally Posted by shonuff View Post
    2 main things:

    1. Any save or die is just tempting fate.

    2. The action economy doesn't make sense. You're better off just attacking.
    1.OK so these rules are from DAGE so can be ignored if that's not your bag.
    2. I have made this equivalent to the Assassin from the Fantasy Companion who has to take a minor and major action to reaply poisons. Perhaps I should make all of the damaging potions more powerful to reflect that....Also most players would load up their weapons before combat so action point economy would be less of an issue. I don't imagine players to be using blade venoms all of the time.
    Last edited by Phantomdoodler; 03-15-2018 at 09:02 AM.

  4. #4
    OPA Belta
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    Re: Poisons in Fantasy AGE

    1. Yeah, the D-AGE rules tend to throw in save or die when they shouldn't.

    2. I would either seriously buff poison effects -- because Novice and Journeyman are weak for the cooldown. Or I would allow for the one application to last the entirety of combat. Archery might require a Crafting check and a monetary investment for a hand-waved mechanism. And I would only allow a target to be affected by a poison 1x/turn.

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