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Thread: New Military Units and Equipment

  1. #11
    OPA Belta
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    Re: New Military Units and Equipment

    Quote Originally Posted by Kajani View Post
    With cheap I mean the material. Of course the material for bows were not just cut in the open forest (I have read that it was even grown in some cases in special tree-plantations) and often was not "English" but imported. however I think for a crossbow you need (especially for the more advanced types) a little bit more skill and time.
    I guess it would not be any real problem to build longbows for other "nations" - it would be possible to get the people who know how to build it and to get the material, too. The real point was that you had not the men to use it and I guess medieval armies simply had not the patience to build long-lasting "schools" for their own special corps of longbow fighters - some did just buy them in the form of mercs who surely brought their weapons with them (but must get some supply over time, I guess).
    Well, given the special need for the woods of the longbow I'm actually more inclined to think that the longbow would have more pricely material than the a normal crossbow. I don't think that you need special kinds of wood or iron to make a crossbow but without going into the details I think that you need some very special wood to make a proper longbow. An arbalest would surely have been more on the same level as a longbow in terms of skills of construction and so, but materials could probably have been cheaper for an arbalest.

    In regards to getting makers to move, the fact that longbows didn't spread outside of the British Islands kind of shows that either it was to expensive, there were not social factors to make it interesting or the English kings managed to retain their bowyers at home. One could also think that a longbow-making bowyer would know where to get his material and what markets there were for his products in Westeros, and certainly at his own regional market. But if he moved to Essos, what would he know about his prospective chances of keeping up his trade there? Maybe he could attach himself to a sellsword company but the life in the train of a sellsword company might not be what he wants for himself or his family, and so on.

    And finally, like you mentioned, creating and supporting the lifestyle that's necessary to use longbows is a major investment for generations, and presumably it exists in Westeros. But in Essos they use sellswords mostly and the sellsword archers probably joins their companies with skills from the start so there's precious little need to raise new archers from scratch.

    That's how I see it.

  2. #12
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    Re: New Military Units and Equipment

    Thanks for the comments and ideas, here come some additional units (cavalry and transport vessels). We will continue with unith of the Wall and byaond and later with some from other parts of the World beyond Westeros

    :::::::::
    Cavalry
    :::::::::




    ........................
    Mounted Archers
    ........................

    These units are rare in most parts of Westeros, but very common in Dorne. Beyond the sea the Dothraki horse archers are a well-known thread to all their neighbours. In most cases these fighters have not much armour and use light horses, for example the famous sand steeds of Dorne, which are excellent suited for such sort of warfare. They evade close combat and try to decimate and demoralize the enemy by countless volleys of arrows. North of Dorne, such fighting tactics are uncommon (sometimes even unknown), and this way of war does not really fit with the typical warfare of knights and nobles.

    Power Cost: +5
    Discipline Modifier: +3
    Key Abilities: Animal Handling, Agility, Marksmanship

    Start Equipment/ Equipment Upgrade
    Armor Rating: 2/ 3
    Armor Penalty: -1/ -2
    Bulk: 0/ 0
    Fighting Damage: Athletics/ Athletics+1
    Marksmanship Damage: Agility +1, Long Range/ Agility +2, Long Range




    ...................
    Light Cavalry
    ...................

    These men are a less expensive but also less reliable alternative to regular cavalry. They normally ride on rounseys, wear only light armour and are armed with javelins, spears and side arms. They are not designed to crush units of well-organized infantry or face ‘real’ cavalry, but are useful for swift raids, recognisance operations, border patrol and attacks from the rear or flanks. They are also designed to hunt down light infantry, archers or fleeing forces, act as fore riders, scouts or highly mobile raiders. Light cavalry is often less disciplined than regular cavalry because it is build out of mercenaries and similar less reliable people. Light Cavalry is quite common in Dorne, and many Dothraki fight in similar way. In the northern parts of Westeros, light cavalry is mostly mustered by poorer houses, for patrol duties and as a supplement to infantry or heavy cavalry units.

    Power Cost: +4
    Discipline Modifier: +0
    Key Abilities: Animal Handling, Fighting, Agility

    Start Equipment/ Equipment Upgrade
    Armor Rating: 3/ 4
    Armor Penalty: -2/ -2
    Bulk: 0/ 1
    Fighting Damage: Animal Handling + 2/ Animal Handling + 3
    Marksmanship Damage: Agility +1, Close Range/ Agility +2, Close Range





    :::::::
    Ships
    ::::::

    ........................
    Transport vessels
    ........................

    While warships fight the battles at sea and bring the first boots to the shore in any landing operation, a great part of the transport over sea is run by hired merchant ships. Often the need for troops and supply is much higher than the number of warships, which cargo is often limited. Because of this, many lords hire (or force) civilian merchants to support their fleets. However these ships, mostly sailing ships with one or two masts, are vulnerable to attacks by warships (or siege weapons). While they are not completely defenceless, they normally lack heavy weapons and a well trained, well armed crew who can counter ramming or boarding. Some lords invest money and training to solve this problem, but their ships are never an equal opponent for a warship. In wartime transport vessels often form convoys which are protected by warships. However they have one big advantage: If the war is over, they are a good source of income for their owner when they go back to their civilian duties.

    Power Cost: +5/ +6
    Discipline Modifier: +3
    Key Abilities: Awareness, Fighting, Marksmanship

    Start Equipment/ Equipment Upgrade
    Armor Rating: 3/ 5
    Armor Penalty: -/-
    Bulk: -
    Fighting Damage: Athletics/ Athletics +1
    Marksmanship Damage: Agility, Long Range/ Agility +1, Long Range,
    Special Rules: Transport vessels could only be used in terrain with a shore, open sea or at least a river, pond or lake. A unit of transport vessels is build out of five ships and could transport two units of ground forces, four if they are “upgraded” for additional transport capacity, which cost an additional power point. During peace times such units modify the Houses Fortune roll with a +1 modifier because of the trade benefits. A commander or sub-commander could be attached to a unit transport vessels without losing the ability to give commands.
    Last edited by Paedrig; 12-06-2017 at 01:28 PM.

  3. #13
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    Re: New Military Units and Equipment

    :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
    Units of the Wall and the High North
    :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::



    These Units are only to find in the north of Westeros – at the Wall and beyond. Some of them are in fact more a myth – at least for most people in Westeros, who do not know what deadly foe is marching south from the Land of Ever Winter…



    ::::::::::::::::
    Night's Watch
    ::::::::::::::::

    Sworn to protect the realms of men (or condemned to stand guard to the day when death release them from duty), the "Black Brothers" are in some eyes a fellowship of guardians who sacrifice a lot for a greater good. Others (especially nowadays) see them just as a form of penalty-company and dumping pit for misfits, bastards and unwanted. However, even if the men who are sent to the wall are nowadays mainly criminals or people who had not place in their families, they are drilled and trained in an efficient and thorough way like few other soldiers in Westeros. The North knows no mercy with the weak, and the Watch is more northern than anything else is southward of the Wall. This harsh and unforgiving training result in a relatively high morale even in these days, but this may also be a weakness. If they ever stray away from the path they had sworn to follow, mutiny surely would be a great problem - and brothers who had abandoned their vows, are among the most dangerous men in Westeros, since they are skilled, ruthless and have nothing to fear.


    General rules
    * Nigth's Watch units who break away from their oath (for example by interfering with the Game of Thrones the Lords play or fighting each other) get a penalty of +3 to their moral tests. This may increase to +6 in extreme cases (narrator decisions). It reflects that the men, starting to lose the strict discipline they are bound to, becoming more and more unable to control.
    * Rangers and Stewards could be trained (for an additional power point) to use siege weapons (with an ability of Warfare 2), although not as efficient like Builders. They can just use two pieces of siege weapons per unit.

     The following Units are based on the Night’s Watch-Units in the Night’s Watch RPG-book, which were in our opinion a little bit flawed (sometimes the stats were different to the normal rules; some of the units did simply not have stats for being upgraded etc.). So we decided to create new stats as close as possible to the book.



    ............
    Builders
    ............

    These are the engineers who protect the Wall from collapsing, who maintain the buildings of the Fortress and use the siege weapons of the Watch with deadly accuracy. They are soldiers, but not very well experienced in close combat. They could use siege weapons and build field fortifications as normal engineers.


    Power Cost: +2
    Discipline Modifier: +0
    Key Abilities: Endurance, Fighting, Warfare

    Start Equipment/ Equipment Upgrade
    Armor Rating: 2/3
    Armor Penalty: -1/-2
    Bulk: 0/0
    Fighting Damage: Athletics/Athletics+1
    Marksmanship Damage: Agility+1, Short Range/Agility +1, Long Range



    ............
    Rangers
    ............

    They are the sharp sword to the shield, the Wall and the Watch as whole presents. They did not just defend the Wall; they travel beyond and strike the wildling tribes on their own territory. They are battle hardened and highly professional soldiers, although they may lack experience in the great scale war, the lords fight against each other. Rangers often use garrons or ponies to increase their movement, but they are not trained in horse combat, except the rare units of mounted rangers (see below).


    Power Cost: +3
    Discipline Modifier: -3
    Key Abilities: Awareness, Fighting, Marksmanship

    Start Equipment/ Equipment Upgrade
    Armor Rating: 3/4
    Armor Penalty: -2/-2
    Bulk: 0/1
    Fighting Damage: Athletic+1/Athletic+2
    Marksmanship Damage: Agility, Long Range/Agility +1, Long Range



    .........................
    Mounted Rangers
    .........................

    Of limited use to defend the Wall itself, this men - of which the Watch rarely had many - are essential in crushing great hordes of wildlings long before they could reach the Wall, or quickly discover, follow and destroy those who had made it through the Wall. The slaughter of the armies of Gendel and Gorne was such a rare occasion. They wear lighter armour than normal cavalry wear, but are as disciplined as their southern counterparts are. They use javelins, light lances and are equipped with shields.


    Power Cost: +4
    Discipline Modifier: -6
    Key Abilities: Agility, Animal Handling, Fighting

    Start Equipment/ Equipment Upgrade
    Armor Rating: 4/5
    Armor Penalty: -2/-3
    Bulk: 1/2
    Fighting Damage: Animal Handling+3/Animal Handling+4
    Marksmanship Damage: Agility, Short Range/Agility +1, Short Range


    ..............
    Stewards
    ..............

    While they had the basic training of all men of the Watch - which is often superior to that normal soldiers got - their main task is to supply the Watch, not fight their battles - if not the Wall itself is attacked or breached. In this case, they are men who should not be underestimated. Stewards are equipped with shields, if they march into battle.


    Power Cost: +2
    Discipline Modifier: +0
    Key Abilities: Awareness, Fighting, Marksmanship*

    * if the Narrator allows it, a Steward unit may increase Healing instead of one this abilities - and by testing this ability, reducing the losses of a fight for another unit (test against 9, if successful +2 to the result of the table for combat results)

    Start Equipment/ Equipment Upgrade
    Armor Rating: 2/3
    Armor Penalty: -1/-2
    Bulk: 0/0
    Fighting Damage: Athletics+1/Athletics+2
    Marksmanship Damage: Agility, Short Range/Agility +1, Long Range



    ::::::::::::::::::::::::::
    Units of the Long Night
    ::::::::::::::::::::::::::



    ..........
    Wights
    ..........

    For most people these undead servants of the Others – reanimated corpses of slain foes and animals – are only a myth. But the wildlings beyond the wall (and in recent times also members of the Night Watch) did know, that there is truth within the legends. While slow, most times unarmoured, unarmed and unable to form any elaborate formation, these walking dead are still a gruesome foe. They need no food, water or rest, they know neither fear nor mercy – and their horrible appearance, cold determination and hate for all living beings can unnerve even seasoned opponents.
    There are stories of ancient human necromancers, who could raise the dead as their servants with dark rituals or artefacts, however the only who are known to do this in recent times, are the Others.


    Power Cost: 1
    Population Cost: 1 (green), 2 (trained)
    Discipline Modifier: - (see Special Rules)
    Key Abilities: Athletic, Endurance, Fighting,

    Start Equipment/ Equipment Upgrade
    Armor Rating: 1/ 2
    Armor Penalty: 0/-1
    Bulk: 0
    Fighting Damage: Athletics/ Athletics +1

    Special Rules: Wights can only be mustered as “green” or “trained”, depending on what people were slain for ‘recruiting’. If a unit is upgraded after a fight, this simply reflects the “recruiting” of new (and better) “raw materials”.
    Every unit, facing a unit of wights the first time, must succeed in a disciple test or becomes disorganized (or routed if already disorganized)
    Wights cannot run, charge or perform any other manoeuvre which changes the speed or built any formation.
    They can only perform two manoeuvres during a combat round, notwithstanding the number of commands of their commander (most probably a White Walker).
    However, their ‘commander’ did not need a Control test, because wights are normally controlled by magic and have no own will or morale that can be broken. Therefore, when disorganized/ routed, there is no negative Disciple Modifier (although they still get the malus for abilities/ fighting tests).
    Fire (for example by siege weapons) or incendiary ammunition deals Damage +1.
    Wights get no negative modification by darkness.


    ......................................
    The Others/ White Walkers
    ......................................

    Even more feared than their undead servants (and even more believed to be a myth by most people in Westeros) are the legendary Others or White Walkers, who came with the Long Night (or were brought by the Long Night?) 8.000 years ago. Most people nowadays think, that these stories are simply a myth, that the Others never existed or were at least extinct 8.000 years ago. But the Wildlings beyond the Wall (and more and more Brothers of the Night Watch too) did know that this is not true. The White Walkers in fact never had left the surface of the earth and their number is rising. No one knows, how many of them exist or what their aims are – but eventually a new Long Night might fall on earth and the Others will start again their bloody march towards south. Since their number is small (at least until now) the Others appear rarely in big groups. However, even a handful of them is strong enough to slay human soldiers like cattle or drive them away simply by their appearance and the terror that they carry with them.
    A “unit” of White Walkers consists of 10 members. They may use mounts - either wights of slain horses, elks, bears etc. or the legendary ice-spiders. but they do not use them as real battle mounts. In this cases, the movement is increased to 60 yards.

    Recruting Cost: - (the Others can never be mustered or controlled by humans)
    Discipline Modifier: -6
    Key Abilities: Athletic, Endurance, Fighting,
    Equipment
    Armor Rating: 8
    Armor Penalty: 0
    Bulk: 0
    Fighting Damage: Athletic +2

    Special Rules:
    White Walkers are always Veteran or Elite Units.
    Every human unit, facing the Others the first time, must succeed in a disciple test +3 or becomes disorganized (or routed if already disorganized).
    After destroying a unit, the next round the Others can raise a ‘green’ unit of Wights with a normal command.
    While operating in snowy terrain, the Others get +1D for Sneak.
    Others get no penalty when fighting in Darkness or in snowy terrain.
    Others get a -1D penalty when fighting in Daylight.
    Units armed with dragonglass (for example arrows or javelin heads) ignore the armour of the Others and deal +1 Damage.

  4. #14
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    Re: New Military Units and Equipment

    ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
    Units from the Lands abroad
    ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

    All these Units are either rather exotic and rarely (if ever) seen on the continent of Westeros



    ...................
    The Unsullied
    ...................

    Some consider these slave soldiers of the Slaverbay Cities as the best light infantry of the world. Castrated as young boys and trained with brutal discipline and drugs to suppress any feelings of fear, pain or disobedience, they are excellent fighters both as skirmishers as in closed ranks. Although normally not heavy armored (due to the climate of their homeland) they can stand against heavy infantry and are a deadly foe even for cavalry. They will literally fight to victory or death, notwithstanding any odds or losses. However many conventional troops and nobles, who have not yet seen the combat performance of the Unsullied, will probably underestimate them due to their ‘lack of manliness’ – an often fatale failure.


    Power Cost: +1
    Wealth Cost for buying a Unit: +6 (trained), +9 (veteran), +12 (elite)
    Discipline Modifier: -6
    Key Abilities: Athletic, Endurance, Fighting

    Start Equipment/ Equipment Upgrade
    Armor Rating: 1/ 4
    Armor Penalty: 0/ -2
    Bulk: 0/ 1
    Fighting Damage: Athletic + 1/ Athletic +2
    Marksmanship Damage: Agility, Short Range/ Agility +1, Short Range

    Special Rules: Unsullied can only be bought with at least trained quality.
    As ‘normal’ infantry, they are armed with shields and can therefore built formations like shield wall, tortoise and phalanx.
    For upgrading an already bought unit (or units which are ‘downgraded’ by fighting losses), Wealth must been spend as mentioned above.
    Given to their brutal, drug supported training, the Unsullied never gain negative Discipline Modifier, neither by losses nor by their formation (however they get the normal modifiers for fighting and other tests, defence etc.). Any will test against fear etc. will succeed automatically.



    ............
    Chariots
    ...........

    While in Westeros only used by the wildlings north of the Wall (with dogs as draft animals), in Essos horse driven chariots were a famous weapon among the fallen Sarnori kingdoms, often crewed by a man and his wife. The Sarnori are almost gone, but chariots are still occasionally used in battle. They are a dangerous weapon, nearly as fast as horses, but they have problems in rough terrain and even lightwood could limit their movement. Regularly a chariot with a crew of two, sometimes three men is drawn into battle by two to four mounts. The main danger comes from bows or crossbows of the crew, since they could carry a great amount of ammunition, and shoot more accurate and reload faster than most horsed archers. They are also armed with long spears. The mounts of more sophisticated war chariots are often armored, and the chariots have scythes on their wheels and pikes on their whiffletrees, which could cause a great amount of damage to horses and foot soldiers in open formations. A unit of chariots contains 20 chariots. Their normal movement is 70 yards.


    Power Cost: +5
    Discipline Modifier: +0
    Key Abilities: Animal Handling, Fighting, Marksmanship

    Start Equipment/ Equipment Upgrade
    Armor Rating: 4/6
    Armor Penalty: -2/-3
    Bulk: 1/2
    Fighting Damage: Animal Handling+3/Animal Handling+4
    Marksmanship Damage: Agility+1, Long Range/Agility +2, Long Range

    Special rules:
    Chariots may perform the trample maneuver. If successful, their wheels and scythes deal 6 points of damage instead of 5 like a cavalry unit did.
    A commander can attach himself to a unit of chariots without losing the ability to issue orders.
    Chariots in lightwood suffer slow movement, and very slow movement in dense wood.
    They could not operate in mountains and have slow movement in hills.



    ..............
    Elephants
    .............

    This kind of unit is used only beyond the civilized parts of Westeros. The wildings north of the Wall use mammoths in war, and some armies beyond the sea also have war elephants, including the (in)famous Golden Company. The elephants of civilised armies are often armoured, their tusks equipped with huge scimitars, their flanks covered with leather, mail or scale. On their neck not only a rider is placed, but also a basket-like “saddle” for up to five soldiers, armed with long lances, bows and crossbows. Elephant units are expensive in creation and need a lot of food and care, but they are effective – frightening even trained cavalry. On the other hand, elephants sometimes go in a fighting frenzy or panic when attacked with fire. A typical unit includes around 10 elephants and between 40 and 60 men. They are faster than infantry but not as fast as riders – moving 60 yards a round, four times of that if they sprint, but the movement is reduced by bulk as normal.

    Power Cost: +7
    Discipline Modifier: +0
    Key Abilities: Athletic, Endurance, Fighting

    Start Equipment/ Equipment Upgrade
    Armor Rating: 4/ 6
    Armor Penalty: -2/ -3
    Bulk: 1/ 2
    Fighting Damage: Athletic + 4/ Athletic + 6
    Marksmanship Damage: Agility +1, Long Range/ Agility +2, Long Range

    Special Rules: Facing elephants result in a discipline modification of +3 for units which had no experience or training with such foes. However, if attacked with fire, the elephant-unit must make himself a discipline-roll or become routed.
    Elephant-units start with an increased Endurance of 3 even if they are green.

  5. #15
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    Re: New Military Units and Equipment

    Here also some additional equipment and rules for military units (don't know if I or my co-player Kajani had posted this on annother place already. Hope that these rules are of use...




    ******
    Shields (1 Wealth Point per unit)
    ******
    While only cavalry, infantry, mercenaries and personal guards automatically have shields, many units could be equipped with shields to increase their defensive abilities and give them some additional options for formations (although a lack of discipline might make this challenging for some of them).
    Potential equipped units: criminals, crusaders, garrison, guerrillas, raiders, sailors, slingers, light cavalry

    Effect:
    - getting +1D for the Defensive-manoeuvre
    - could build the formations phalanx, shield wall and tortoise




    ******
    Mounts (1 Wealth Point per unit)
    ******
    Cavalry is one of the most effective units, but needs great sums of gold and years of training for men and horses. However sometimes there is the need to increase the mobility of infantry units without having the time, money (and will) for intensive riding training and the mustering of ‘real’ warhorses.
    It is (relatively) cheap to get enough mounts for an infantry unit if you are willing to use second rate quality like rounseys, garrons, stots, sometimes even mules. And most soldiers could ride good enough to at least stay in the saddle (or learn this in short time).
    Of course such mounted infantry lacks the combat power, discipline and abilities of ‘real’ cavalry – but with a significant increase of mobility they are an ideal asset for raids, long range redeployment and patrol operations.
    Units with siege weapons or cumbersome equipment (mantlets, battering rams, ladders etc.) could not become mounted.

    Effect:
    While such an ‘upgrade’ is mostly for an increase of strategic mobility, mounted infantry did also have a higher tactical mobility on the battle ground.
    As long as they are mounted they are moving with the speed of cavalry units.
    However mounted infantry units could not attack and get a +3 discipline modification.
    To dismount/ mount is a normal maneuver (+3 if the unit is under attack/ fire).




    *******************
    Incendiary Ammunition (1/2 wealth per unit)
    *******************
    Such ammunition is mostly used during sieges against wooden structures or buildings and also in sea battles. In ‘normal’ battles, the use is limited, also because such ammunition almost halved down the effective fire range of the firing unit. However sometimes incendiary arrows are used to demoralize untrained enemies or to ‘lighten up’ an area during night battles/ ambushes.

    Effect:
    Cost: ˝ Wealth per unit. Only foot units with long range or short range weapons can be equipped with incendiary ammunition.
    To use incendiary ammunition with an equipped unit, the use must be declared before the battle starts. If the unit want to change their type of ammunition during fight (from normal to incendiary and vice versa), a command must been spend for this.
    Incendiary ammunition half down the fire range of the unit (to 100 yards for long range weapons and 10 yards for short range weapons).

    For use against constructions:
    For attacks against flammable siege weapons (siege towers, covered rams, tortoise) and ships, the damage is increased by +1.

    For use in battle:
    Against units which are especially vulnerable against fire (f. e. the legendary wights and ships) the damage is increased by +1.
    Units (and ships, but not wights), which are attacked by incendiary ammunition, also get a +1 modifier for their Discipline for 1 Combat Round.
    Elephants which are attacked by fire must additionally do a disciple test or become routed.
    During night, every unit/ area which is hit by incendiary ammunition is lit up for 1 combat round (reducing the visibly penalty by one step).
    If an attack with incendiary ammunition is a critical miss (failing the target defense by 5 or more) the firing unit itself got a hit with ˝ of the damage of a normal attack with incendiary ammunition.

    Optional rules:
    Against wooden fortification (wooden palisades, towers etc.) it is advised to tread these structures similar to mobile siege weapons.
    Wooden towers and walls did have similar stats like siege towers or covered rams (Health 20, AR 8).
    Palisades like a simple stockade did have a Health 15 and AR 6.
    Unfortified wooden buildings did have Health 10 and AR 5.
    If the health goes down to 0, the structure will collapse the next round.




    *******************************
    Fighting with smaller unit detachments
    *******************************
    If only detachments of units stand against each other, it is the best to use the rules for normal units (f. e. if 50 foot soldiers fight against 50 foot soldiers/ 10 riders or if 20-30 foot soldiers fight against the same number of infantry or 5 riders) to make things not unnecessary complicated.
    However if there is a clear and disproportional difference between the numbers of the fighting units (f. e. a halved down unit against a full one) than it is needed to modify the rules.
    If a halved down unit fight against a full one (or a quartered against a halved one), the health of the weaker unit has to be reduced by -3 and the damage by -1. This should be increased if the disproportion is even more severe.



    ***********
    Forced March
    ***********
    Long marches are an important part of most military campaigns. Normally, the speed of a column is only as high as its slowest members – the impedimenta, siege weapons or the most heavily armed and armored men. But sometimes (perhaps to reach a strategic important destination in time, to retreat or to follow a retreating enemy) extra speed is needed. A forced march significantly increases the distance a unit travels (depending on the moral and stamina of the troops) between 30 and 100 percent, but such a maneuver is hated by most soldiers, demands an able commander and good morale and – especially if it is performed several days in a row – can lower the moral and fighting abilities of the exhausted men.

    Rules:
    If a unit should perform a forced march, the commander must do a command test per day. Every two days of forced march in a row increase the difficulty by +3. This means the first two days the difficulty is +0, the next two days +3, than +6 etc.
    After a day of resting (or two days of normal march speed) the difficulty for an additional forced march is reduced by one step.

    The difficulty can be increased (and decreased) by +/-1 to +/-3 by weather, climate, road conditions, supply situation etc.
    A failed test means that the unit did not increase its speed.
    A glitch (difference between difficulty and test result equal or more than 5) means the unit gets disorganized:
    The commander must do an extra command test to reorganize the unit. If such a unit is ambushed or had to face an enemy during the marsh, the unit starts as disorganized and in ‘Mob’-formation.

    A unit on a forced march might also face an increased difficulty for stamina tests because of bad weather, insufficient supplies or especially harsh terrain (for the rules see marching under severe conditions)



    ***************************
    Marching under severe conditions
    ***************************
    To win a military campaign means much more than only fight the enemy. To operate under harsh weather conditions or without food can lower the moral and fighting abilities – especially if the soldiers must shoulder exhausting tasks like forced marches or fighting.
    Often the climate, illness, famine and exhaustion kill or maim more soldiers than swords and arrows and some campaigns were lost without even facing the enemy.

    Rules:
    If a military unit have to operate under harsh conditions (without food and water, during the winter/ other catastrophic climate or weather conditions, face diseases etc.), the unit must perform a stamina test with a difficulty between 3 and 9.
    The difficulty can be increased and decreased by +/-1 to +/-3 depending on the equipment and other factors (f. e. if the unit also has to fight or perform forced marches and other tedious duties). The difficulty might also increase over time if the unit does not get rest or supplies.
    If the test fails, the moral, health or damage of the unit is temporally decreased by 1 because of lacking moral, lost equipment or ill/ dead/ deserted soldiers.
    A day of rest enables the commander to negate the effect by performing the order Regroup.
    A glitched stamina test (difference between difficulty and test result equal or more than 5) means that the stats losses are doubled.
    A support-unit in the army could lower the difficulty for up to four units by -3 with a successful test (9) for any unit (healing to help infantry, animal handling to help cavalry).



    ******
    Stakes (1/2 wealth per unit)
    ******
    It is common in warfare to use natural (f. e. hills, woods and rills) and manmade (irrigation digs, rills, trenches, walls and stockades etc.) obstacles to hinder the movement of enemy forces and give your own men cover. However you did not always have the time to find the ‘right’ battlefield or to erect such obstacles.
    Stakes however are mobile, a quick to erect and cheap solution for this problem if you want to build a march camp or create a protective obstacle for enemy attacks on the battlefield.

    Rules:
    To ‘arm’ a unit with stakes costs ˝ wealth points per unit. If used for erecting a march camp or if you have enough time (ca. 6 hours) for more sophisticated battlefield fortifications, these equipment mean, that you gain a +2 defensive bonus for the unit.

    However stakes are also quiet useful in the heat of battle. If a unit equipped with stakes (and these were not already spend for a camp or battlefield fortification) the unit can erect a improvised stockade if the commander spend a single command (and a successful command test). This improvised stockade gives +1 Defense – but only in one direction.
    The stakes could be regathered with a new command and then used again on a different place on the battlefield.
    If the unit is destroyed or flees routed the battlefield, the stakes (and the investment) are lost.



    **********
    March Camp
    **********
    It is said that in the old days of the legions of Ghis, building a well-organized march camp every day was common practice. However these days are gone and in Westeros and abroad many troops lack the ability, the tools – and foremost many officers and commanders lack the knowledge and will – to spend time and workforce for such an enterprise. Fortified and thorough guarded camps are often only erected for sieges or other occasions when the troops had to stay for more than one night. On the march, a few more or less well placed guards and hasty erected tents (if the troops even HAVE tents) must do it. However more sophisticated commanders with a thorough understanding of warfare (especially when operating in hostile territory) still know how to build a real march camp for the night – and are able to motivate their soldiers to follow their orders.

    Rules:
    To build a march camp needs time and therefore reduce the daily travel distance up to 1/3. This loss could be slightly decreased if the army sends vanguards which search after a good place for a camp and take first preparations (but are also in danger of being ambushed).
    A command test must be performed. A successful test gives the units inside the camp +1 defense (+ 2 if they are equipped with stakes or if an engineer unit is building the camp).
    Also the units got +1 for their passive awareness result for any probable stealth attack during the night, reflecting the presence of well-placed guards, watch-fires and probably even a stockade or wagon box.

    If the command test for the camp fails, the erected camp does not give any positive effects for defense or passive awareness. A glitched test (difference between test result and difficulty is equal or more than 5) might mean that some of the troops react dissatisfied to the additional work (temporally control malus) or lower the defense or passive awareness by unintentionally creating an opportunity to infiltrate the camp.



    *****************
    Keep the men in line
    *****************
    Often a victory in a battle or the successful assault on a castle or fortified city ends in a bloodshed, with undiscriminating plundering, pillaging, killing and raping. While some commanders consider this simply as the traditional ‘right’ of their men, other might try to prevent or stop such behavior – perhaps because they want to keep the stormed city/ castle intact or because their code of honor dictate them to show leniency. However to keep the men under control is a tricky task, which can be even problematic in friendly territory – especially if the men are hungry, unpaid or former criminals. Some commanders even have fallen under the swords of their own men trying to stop a massacre.

    Rules:
    On the march: To ensure, that no stealing, plundering or other forms of misconduct against civilians did occur, demands a normal Command Test per day by the commander or sub-commander. Any command only ensures the behavior of one unit, so controlling the behavior of more units demands additional tests by the commander or sub-commanders. A commander can perform no more tests than his rank in Warfare, so larger armies need sub-commanders.
    The test difficulty might be increased or decreased by +/-1 to +/- 3 according to the circumstances (not enough – or plenty – of food/ salaries, weather conditions, a great number of troops and not enough officers, former losses, operating in friendly/ hostile territory etc.).
    A failure means that unwanted incidents MIGHT occur, not that they will occur automatically.
    However if a test is a glitch (difference between difficulty and test result equal or more than 5), some serious misconducts will happen.

    After the battle: keeping the men in line after a bloody battle is much more difficult than preventing any probable misconduct during the march.
    After the battle is won, the commander (and/ or his sub-commanders) can perform a command test +3 for each unit.
    The test can be modified by +/-1 to +/-3, representing circumstances like heavy casualties, a long lasting enmity between the two sides, lack (or abundance) of food and salaries etc., the promise of financial compensation for the men etc.
    The command can also be given BEFORE the battle. In this case Tests for each unit must be performed before and also after the battle; however both tests have only a difficulty according to the discipline of the unit (which however again could be modified by the circumstances).

    If there are more units than the commander and sub-commander have orders, it might take several rounds to get the men in line – which also mean that the troops probably already had started plundering.

    If the test fails, the troops start plundering, but the test can be repeated like any other commands.
    However if the test is a glitch (difference between difficulty and test result is equal or more than 5) any further test to control the men is modified +3. Also the commander might have to face one, two or even more enraged soldiers (stats according to the unit type) who attack their own officer to have their way with the defeated enemies and civilians…



    *****************
    Fortified settlements
    *****************
    The normal cover small towns and greater settlements offers reflect the kind of fortifications they have typically – in most cases almost no fortifications for a hamlet, a stockade and wall made from earth for a small town, a small stonewall for a small city and huge walls like those of King’s Landing for a large city. But some lords want to increase the strength of their towns and villages further.
    It is also possible for units to increase the defense a settlement could give them by blocking streets, erect barricades etc., which is often done during sieges.

    Rules:
    To increase the cover of a settlement for one step permanently (a hamlet so that it have the cover of a small town, a small town to that of a small city) cost 5 points of Defense. It is not common (and should not done without good reason) to increase the cover for more than one step. The increase of the cover of a small city to that of a large city cost 10 points of Defense. Such an increase cost some time to build – W3+1 months for the cover of a small town, W6+6 months for that of a small city and 2W6+12 months for that of a large city.

    Units in towns/hamlets could erect additional fortifications like those in the field (defense bonus +1). They could increase the defense on the wall (in that case they create obstacles for the attackers, increase the cover on the walls etc.) and/or also erect barricades in the town (which have the same effect, but the bonus counts only if they retreat from the walls and fought in the streets). As always, engineers give a bonus of +2 in both cases.

    A hamlet could harbor not more than two units, a small town four.

    Every unit could build additional defenses on the walls or in the settlement for one unit in six hours, but the maximum of shifts they can perform is two per day. It is possible to convince or force the population to do the work for you, but this demands a warfare (12) test for every set. The population of a hamlet could erect one set of fortifications per shift, a small town two, a small city four – and the population of a large city could easily do the work for much more units. However such huge crowds are dangerous and hard to control in times of war (narrator decides for additional problems – raise the difficulty of the control-test or so – and a critical failure nearly always result in some kind of riot or other catastrophe).

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