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Thread: Wonders of Thedas Episode 23: What's Your Age?

  1. #11
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    Re: Wonders of Thedas Episode 23: What's Your Age?

    Quote Originally Posted by Parsival View Post
    How would you deal with the possibility of demonic possession? With a rule mechanic, or would it be story driven?
    Story-driven, without hesitation. While it is possible to reverse, it is resource intensive, so you're probably going to be re-rolling a character. And if it's rule driven, and the character is savable, it can happen multiple times. A repeatable "save Bob from the Fade" quest doesn't really sound very fun. And if you built a mage, it's because you most likely wanted to play one, so if you have to re-roll one, what are you going to build? Most likely a mage, and there are only really so many alterations of that in D-AGE. So you basically start over with a similar build, but lose history and interactions.

    But if Bob the mage were to progressively darken, and then given chances to bargain with demons? That's a fun potential plot line. However, it should be player driven, not the result of a die roll.

    In my campaign, possession is something that happens to others. IMO mages' power progression doesn't warrant it as a mechanical balancing necessity.

  2. #12
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    Re: Wonders of Thedas Episode 23: What's Your Age?

    Interestingly, ditching miscasts would make the Willpower stat even less important than it already is...

  3. #13
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    Re: Wonders of Thedas Episode 23: What's Your Age?

    Quote Originally Posted by Parsival View Post
    Interestingly, ditching miscasts would make the Willpower stat even less important than it already is...
    But does it, really? First, I would say that WIL is pretty important already. Tons of saves rely on it, including one of them that is the most easily saved against -- Bluff. Backstab pretty much is a guarantee for the rogue, but Bluff (potentially more dangerous as it doesn't require movement) is based on COM, Deception, and Oratory, which are definitely more of an investment than DEX, Stealth, and Scouting.

    Second, it's still only a hazard for mages, who already have the higher TNs, resource management, and double jeopardy. All for spells, which by and large aren't any stronger than a mage's spells - a rogue archer with high SP can easily hit 5d6+75 at level 11.

    Conversely, it also is only a penalty if it happens. From my experience, mishaps happen very rarely, so in actuality, it was complexity that had no real impact. I'm a fan of complexity in general - I find that correctly used, it adds depth and nuance. However, complexity for its own sake is as detrimental as simplicity for simplicity's sake.

    And if you had the experience one of my player's had, it colors the whole game. The first time she tried casting Lightning Bolt, she had a mishap (and she should have succeeded). For sessions afterwards, she stuck with low level spells, not wanting another mishap; however, she definitely felt less useful than the other players, who were stronger regardless and also didn't have that potential penalty.

    Finally, it arguably weakens WIL as a stat for mages. If you prepare for failure too much, and boost WIL to mitigate, then you are actually going to fail more often, and your WIL won't be high enough to truly mitigate anyway.

    Tl;dr: magical mishaps are a cumbersome penalty solely on the weakest class, and more likely to reward focusing on MAG and low level spells than actual diversification.

  4. #14
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    Re: Wonders of Thedas Episode 23: What's Your Age?

    Personally, I've been considering a separate mishap mechanic. It's not past the idea phase - and it might never make it there, honestly. But I like the idea of a complication result, rather than straight success/failure (with crits of each).

    But basically, the gist is:

    For any player initiated test, the GM rolls 1d10&2d6. On a result of a 1 (d10), a complication arises, and then the GM would consult the d6s.

    6-8: minor inconvenience
    4,5,9,10: moderate inconvenience
    2,3,11,12: severe inconvenience

    These would be separate from the actual success or failure. So a successful attack might kill the guard, but a severe inconvenience might be something like a stray bullet hits the computer that the PCs were trying to get (yeah, that's not fantasy, but that's the example that always springs to mind).

    Again, it's not past the idea phase. I like the concept, but I would prefer if it were actually a part of the existing system more. I think a separate dice roll might actually be too much rolling, but there it is.

  5. #15
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    Re: Wonders of Thedas Episode 23: What's Your Age?

    Another idea I had was that failing with doubles generated a mishap, with severity by the Dragon Die, and success equaling the TN generated a complication (again by the Dragon Die).

    That seemed to be too complex - two different methods for the same thing, both relying on player input at times where their interest wanes slightly.

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