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Thread: Jab's Builds!

  1. #4271
    OPA Belta
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    Re: Jab's Builds!

    Growing up, mostly what we had available for boys were G.I. Joe dolls "with a kung-fu grip!"...seriously. Boys of my generation were never encouraged to play with dolls (the one time I asked for one when I was about six, I think my dad just about died on the spot). Boys got air rifles or electric race tracks (please remember my youth happened many, many years before the advent of video games or at least their distribution) or sports stuff. My dad bought us some "Socker-Boppers" (essentially inflatable boxing gloves) so we could whip the tar out of each other "safely".

    My father was long since passed away by the time I got my first real "boy" things. I got a .22 rifle and a hunting bow when I was 12...anyway, you get where I'm going here. I was never really cognizant of the disparity between boys dolls...action figures... and girls dolls, but even if I had been, they would've never been allowed in our house anyway. My sister was a tomboy and wanted nothing to do with Barbies and my parents would've killed me if I'd brought home a doll to play with. Back in the day, if a boy played with dolls, there was something seriously wrong with that behavior.

    Then again, if we nearly killed ourselves playing in the swamp in the woods near home (quicksand is real!) or almost got ourselves killed by the neighbors' bull (bulls are large and frequently cranky) or got shot with rock salt for trespassing in the neighbors cow pasture (this happened to me...rock salt hurts like a mother f*****) my parents pretty much shrugged it off. Boys will be boys, y'know.

    It is occasionally interesting to read Jab's missives on the subject of fairies and dolls and whatnot because it's interesting to juxtapose the change in modern childhoods versus mine.

  2. #4272
    OPA Belta Ares's Avatar
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    Re: Jab's Builds!

    I'm a child of the 80's (literally born at the start of the decade), so I grew up during basically the 'Action Figure Renaissance', were we got wave after wave of animated TV series promoting wave after wave of toyline. And while those shows were designed to shill toys to kids, a lot of the people involved in those shows put genuine effort into making something good and worth watching. It spawned a lot of creativity and diversity that likely explains my love of kitchen sink settings and diversity in my entertainment. And man were a lot of those toys cool. I still will wander down the toy aisles of Target or Wal-Mart, and it is kind of sad to see that kind of diversity gone. TMNT, Star Wars, Transformers and Marvel Comics action figures seem to be the big thing these days, the DC showing in such respects is pretty pitiful, and you don't see a lot of independent or minor figures out there.

    Ah well, at least the LEGO aisle remains strong. ^_^

  3. #4273
    OPA Belta digitalangel's Avatar
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    Re: Jab's Builds!

    Quote Originally Posted by Horsenhero View Post
    Growing up, mostly what we had available for boys were G.I. Joe dolls "with a kung-fu grip!"...seriously. Boys of my generation were never encouraged to play with dolls (the one time I asked for one when I was about six, I think my dad just about died on the spot). Boys got air rifles or electric race tracks (please remember my youth happened many, many years before the advent of video games or at least their distribution) or sports stuff. My dad bought us some "Socker-Boppers" (essentially inflatable boxing gloves) so we could whip the tar out of each other "safely".

    My father was long since passed away by the time I got my first real "boy" things. I got a .22 rifle and a hunting bow when I was 12...anyway, you get where I'm going here. I was never really cognizant of the disparity between boys dolls...action figures... and girls dolls, but even if I had been, they would've never been allowed in our house anyway. My sister was a tomboy and wanted nothing to do with Barbies and my parents would've killed me if I'd brought home a doll to play with. Back in the day, if a boy played with dolls, there was something seriously wrong with that behavior.

    Then again, if we nearly killed ourselves playing in the swamp in the woods near home (quicksand is real!) or almost got ourselves killed by the neighbors' bull (bulls are large and frequently cranky) or got shot with rock salt for trespassing in the neighbors cow pasture (this happened to me...rock salt hurts like a mother f*****) my parents pretty much shrugged it off. Boys will be boys, y'know.

    It is occasionally interesting to read Jab's missives on the subject of fairies and dolls and whatnot because it's interesting to juxtapose the change in modern childhoods versus mine.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ares View Post
    I'm a child of the 80's (literally born at the start of the decade), so I grew up during basically the 'Action Figure Renaissance', were we got wave after wave of animated TV series promoting wave after wave of toyline. And while those shows were designed to shill toys to kids, a lot of the people involved in those shows put genuine effort into making something good and worth watching. It spawned a lot of creativity and diversity that likely explains my love of kitchen sink settings and diversity in my entertainment. And man were a lot of those toys cool. I still will wander down the toy aisles of Target or Wal-Mart, and it is kind of sad to see that kind of diversity gone. TMNT, Star Wars, Transformers and Marvel Comics action figures seem to be the big thing these days, the DC showing in such respects is pretty pitiful, and you don't see a lot of independent or minor figures out there.

    Ah well, at least the LEGO aisle remains strong. ^_^
    I feel both of you. I grew up out in the country and a lot on my grandfather's cattle farm (plus always been a tomboy), so right there with the bow and arrow, lawn darts, pellet guns and then real, fishing poles, etc as toys. And yes, rock salt hurts like a mother.... I was also born in 80 and even the boys in the family had some action figures (Transformers, He-Man, etc.)
    Classic car restoring, gun owning, martial arts practicing, military, gamer geek, kinky lesbian IT chick (has your brain exploded yet?)
    My character library

  4. #4274
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    Pat Dugan



    STRIPESY (Pat Dugan)
    Created By:
    Jerry Siegel & Hal Sherman
    First Appearance: Action Comics #40 (Sept. 1941)
    Role: Adult Sidekick
    Group Affiliations: The Seven Soldiers of Victory, The All-Star Squadron, The Justice Society of America, Infinity, Inc.
    PL 7 (101)
    STRENGTH
    4 STAMINA 4 AGILITY 4
    FIGHTING 8 DEXTERITY 2
    INTELLIGENCE 3 AWARENESS 1 PRESENCE 1

    Skills:
    Acrobatics 4 (+8)
    Athletics 4 (+8)
    Close Combat (Unarmed) 2 (+10)
    Deception 4 (+5)
    Expertise (Science) 3 (+6)
    Insight 1 (+2)
    Perception 5 (+6)
    Stealth 2 (+6)
    Technology 7 (+10)
    Vehicles 8 (+10)

    Advantages:
    Equipment 3 (Star Rocket Racer- Car with Flight), Fast Grab, Improved Critical (Unarmed), Improved Hold, Inventor, Ranged Attack 4, Set-Up, Teamwork

    Offense:
    Unarmed +10 (+4 Damage, DC 19)
    Initiative +4

    Defenses:
    Dodge +10 (DC 20), Parry +10 (DC 20), Toughness +4, Fortitude +6, Will +5

    Complications:
    Relationship (Sylvester Pemberton)

    Total: Abilities: 54 / Skills: 40--20 / Advantages: 13 / Powers: 0 / Defenses: 14 (101)

    -Stripesy, as mentioned, was the Adult Sidekick to The Star-Spangled Kid's Teen Hero- a true rarity, they nonetheless had a pretty solid partnership. Stripsey actually outlived his mentor, and as one of the few famous Greasemonkeys in DC, he got to show up as a minor guy fixing stuff if anybody ever needed it. Note that though history has made Stripsey a genius mechanic, back in the day, the Kid himself was depicted as a super-genius wunderkind with tons of skills of his own.

    ---



    S.T.R.I.P.E. (Pat Dugan, aka Stripesy)
    Created By:
    Jerry Siegel & Hal Sherman
    First Appearance: Action Comics #40 (Sept. 1941)
    Role: Kid-Hero Turned Adult
    Group Affiliations: The Seven Soldiers of Victory, The All-Star Squadron, The Justice Society of America, Infinity, Inc.
    PL 8 (144)
    STRENGTH
    3/9 STAMINA 4 AGILITY 2
    FIGHTING 8 DEXTERITY 4
    INTELLIGENCE 3 AWARENESS 2 PRESENCE 1

    Skills:
    Acrobatics 2 (+3)
    Athletics 4 (+8)
    Deception 4 (+5)
    Expertise (Science) 4 (+7)
    Insight 3 (+5)
    Perception 5 (+6)
    Stealth 4 (+5)
    Technology 8 (+11)
    Vehicles 6 (+10)

    Advantages:
    Equipment 2 (Fans, Flashlights in S.T.R.I.P.E.), Interpose, Inventor, Ranged Attack 4, Set-Up, Teamwork

    Powers:
    "S.T.R.I.P.E. Power Armor" (Flaws: Removable) [52]
    Enhanced Strength 6 (12)
    Protection 5 (5)
    "Large Machine" Features 2: Increased Mass (2)
    "Missiles" Blast 8 (Extras: Multiattack) (24) -- (25)
    • AE: "Taser Cables" Electrical Damage 8 (Feats: Reach 3) (Extras: Multiattack) (19)

    Flight 7 (250 mph) (14)
    Immunity 4 (Suffocation 2, Pressure, Vacuum) (4)
    Senses 4 (Radio, Extended Sight, Distance Sense, Infravision) (4)

    Reduced Defenses -1 (-2)
    -- (64 points)

    Offense:
    Unarmed +10 (+4 Damage, DC 19)
    Missiles +8 Area (+8 Ranged Damage, DC 23)
    Taser Cables +8 (+8 Ranged Affliction, DC 18)
    Initiative +4

    Defenses:
    Dodge +7 (+8 Out of Suit, DC 17-18), Parry +7 (+8 Out of Suit, DC 17-18), Toughness +4 (+9 Armor), Fortitude +6, Will +6

    Complications:
    Relationship (Courtney Whitmore- Stepdaughter)
    Relationship (Michael- Son)- Pat generally finds his son Mike to be a pain in the ass.
    Relationship (Wife)- Pat remarried after divorcing Mike's mother.

    Total: Abilities: 50 / Skills: 40--20 / Advantages: 10 / Powers: 52 / Defenses: 12 (144)

    -Ah, comics. Where else can the silliest of all silly sidekicks (the adult subservient to a kid), actually OUTLIVE his mentor, become his own hero in the DC Universe, and actually get a second lease on life as a Power Armor Guy? Cuz that's exactly what Pat did, following his "grease monkey guy" days on Infinity Inc. and assisting Steel and stuff by donning a suit of armor and following the new Star-Spangled Kid around. Of course, he's still a minor-league hero, to the point where he doesn't even join the JLA or act as a regular hero (he's even been a victim of villains out of costume a few times), but hey, it's better than poor Sylvester.

    -Pat's still a very minor character these days, being reduced to supporting cast in a book with a dozen-plus characters already, since Stars & S.T.R.I.P.E. was cancelled. He was a nice father-figure to Courtney, but mostly had to sigh and run along with her, as she got into all kinds of mayhem, while actively trying to divorce Pat from her mom. So he's pretty much a saint in terms of patience and discipline for not just KILLING the little brat and going "Uh, sorry honey, she got into drugs or something... I swear" to her mom.

    -Pat Dugan (not typing out all those "."s between letters again) is kind of a hard guy to stat up, as he's in a VERY weak suit of Power Armor (it breaks in literally Pat's every appearance- something falls off, the jets de-activate, the hull breaks and he starts sticking out of it, etc.), but nonetheless is more expensive than he should be. Good physical stats (but he's nowhere near his athletic prime from the '40s), quite smart, and a good craftsman, but notably not in the Genius area for any of it- he's more of a Greasemonkey than a Tech Guy on any team. The suit itself has mild Regenerating powers (stuff can repair itself on the fly, and he reattached an arm properly just by sticking it back in the socket), and small amounts of what most other suits have. It's almost more of a Mech than a suit of armour (he's not doing ANY lifting, for example- he's actually sitting down inside the suit with his hands on controls), but this is simpler and easier to deal with given the universe he's in.
    Last edited by Jabroniville; 02-18-2015 at 08:35 PM.

  5. #4275
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    Re: Jab's Builds!

    It's fun talking about toys, especially since we all grew up in different areas (and in some cases, times- Ares and I are about the same age, but others are older, and some are a fair bit younger).

    I agree with CyborgSamurai that girl toys had more room to grow- as a kid, it was JUST Barbie and Babies. That was IT- so there was tons of room to pull off the "make cartoons and sell the toys" type stuff, because Barbie was never strong on that front. The only "Girl Shows" I remember as a kid were Rainbow Brite, Strawberry Shortcake, and Jem & The Holograms- and the first two were for REALLY little kids. And Barbie crushed Jem in a remarkably-big hurry.

    And yeah, anime-inspired stuff really helped. The first American Sailor Moon dolls were AWFUL. Outsized clothing, bad comparisons to the characters, etc. Nowadays, you see either Chibi-stuff or actual statuettes, which are MUCH better.

    Boys' toys seem to have peaked about ten-ish years ago. I know that the '80s Transformers stuff is disappointing to me as an adult ("were they seriously all that small and un-dynamic? And cheap plastic?"), but some of the later stuff (like super-sized Unicron toys) was definitely impressive. But for the most part, boys' toys just added a bit more detail (compare the '80s He-Man stuff to today's Collectible stuff, or especially the fairly simple X-Men toys of my youth to the Marvel stuff released today with 900 points of articulation, which ironically ruins the silhouettes and bodies of the character because even the TORSOS have bendability now), then rested on their laurels.

    The bows being popular (especially the purple "Rebelle" bow) is ENTIRELY Hunger Games-related, yeah. And it's part of what I was mentioning earlier- girl toys never used to include WEAPONS, but now someone magically realized that by making girls the centre of an action franchise, you can double the potential audience (same reason why Marvel makes so much money targeting movies to men with action... and women with shirtless Chris Helmsworth).

    Regarding "Home Made Toys", I think every kid I knew had a grandpa who made them homemade nunchucks. I remember playing Visionaries as a kid using a garden sprinkler harness as a hand-weapon because it looked like the white Fox-guy's hand-claw . One of many Boys' Games which was essentially "hit the other person as hard as you can with an improvised weapon". I still laugh thinking about Amy Poehler's autobiographical account of raising boys, expecting to have a nice, quiet life reading to her darling children every night... only to be greeted with a life of hyperactive, dinosaur-obsessed children who greet everyone with karate kicks.

    re: Horsenhero:

    It definitely still isn't "cool" for boys to play with dolls. As a kid, I loved Jem more than Transformers or G.I. Joe (which were both still AWESOME, of course), but would never have DREAMED to admit it to the other boys. You HAD to only like the manly things- I remember getting a bunch of crap because my mom unknowingly bought me a NEW KIDS ON THE BLOCK tape as a kid- some stuff you didn't want getting out.

    When I was in High School, I was obsessed with Sailor Moon, but of course never grabbed the dolls (and not just because they stank). I was a bit more open about it, and only got a few comments from "cooler" kids who overheard, but thankfully there was a nascent anime movement going on in North America by the late '90s and it was more acceptable, at least amongst nerds. I managed to get my suspicious, doubting friend into it, in any case.

    I still doubt there's many boys who would openly talk about Disney Fairies. It's only nerdy adults that can get away with certain behaviors . Look at the modern rise of "Bronies".

  6. #4276
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    Merry, Girl of 1,000 Gimmicks



    MERRY, GIRL OF 1000 GIMMICKS (Meredith Pemberton, aka Merry Creamer)
    Created By:
    Otto Binder & Win Mortimer
    First Appearance: Star-Spangled Comics #81 (June 1948)
    Role: Teen Hero
    Group Affiliations: The Seven Soldiers of Victory, The All-Star Squadron, The Justice Society of America, Infinity, Inc.
    PL 7 (97)
    STRENGTH
    1 STAMINA 2 AGILITY 4
    FIGHTING 8 DEXTERITY 5
    INTELLIGENCE 2 AWARENESS 1 PRESENCE 1

    Skills:
    Acrobatics 5 (+9)
    Athletics 4 (+5)
    Deception 5 (+6)
    Persuasion 4 (+5)
    Perception 3 (+4)
    Insight 3 (+4)
    Sleight of Hand 4 (+9)
    Stealth 4 (+8)

    Advantages:
    Agile Feint, Beginner's Luck, Defensive Attack, Defensive Roll, Grab Finesse, Improved Defense, Improved Disarm, Improved Trip, Improvised Tools, Quick Draw, Ranged Attack 2, Second Chance (Falling)

    Powers:
    "Gimmicks" (Flaws: Easily Removable) [9]
    Variable (Technological Gadgets) 2 (14 points)

    Samples: Bulletproof Baseball Mit (Parry 1, Dodge 3), Electro-Shock Gun (Blast 4), Mult-Kick-On-A-Stick (Strength-Damage +2- Reach 2), Yo-Yo Shooter (Damage 2- Reach 2, Multiattack)

    Offense:
    Unarmed +8 (+1 Damage, DC 16)
    Mule-Kick +8 (+3 Damage, DC 19)
    Electro-Shock Gun +7 (+4 Ranged Damage, DC 19)
    Initiative +4

    Defenses:
    Dodge +8 (+11 Mit, DC 18-21), Parry +9 (+10 Mit, DC 19-20), Toughness +2 (+3 D.Roll), Fortitude +4, Will +5

    Complications:
    Relationship (Sylvester Pemberton- Brother)
    Relationship (Henry King, Sr. & Jr.)- Merry married the villainous Brain Wave (who apparently reformed), later giving birth to a son, who became the heroic Brainwave Jr.

    Total: Abilities: 48 / Skills: 32--16 / Advantages: 13 / Powers: 9 / Defenses: 11 (97)

    -Merry Pemberton was introduced as the adopted teen sister of Sylvester, aka Star-Spangled Kid, to replace Stripsey, probably because fans at the time didn't care for the goofy older sidekick. Her whole thing is that she had various gadgets in and around her costume that could be used to do weird stuff. She got written into "Old Justice" at one point (after being mentioned as deceased Pre-Crisis), disapproving of teen heroing, and had an issue with Stargirl taking her late brother's name, but she eventually got over it. Her other link to the modern era is being the mother of the worst-named superhero of all-time, Brainwave Jr., having married the first Brainwave or something (dunno why a cute teenage sidekick would marry a guy I recall being an old bald man, but there ya go). True story: she actually ousted SS Kid from his own book, for about three issues, until it was cancelled. Doesn't quite beat out poor Alan Scott losing his book to his sidekick DOG, but it's certainly pretty humiliating.

    -Merry's designed around spunky "get outta the way"-style agile hero stats, with Gadgets added on. I personally have never read a Merry-based story, so I have no idea what her gadgets even were or what they were capable of, but I can't imagine them giving any bonuses greater than +5, or be worth more than 10 points combined when all brought to bear. Earth-Two Kenn gave me some info for the only ones HE could remember, and it's mostly whatever the artist felt like drawing. Oddly, Grant Morrison created a girl named Gimmix, who was supposed to be Merry's estranged daughter- she appears to be into superheroing for the fame of it- she is killed by an alien race.
    Last edited by Jabroniville; 02-18-2015 at 10:02 PM.

  7. #4277
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    Courtney Whitmore



    THE STAR-SPANGLED KID II (Courtney Whitmore)
    Created By:
    Geoff Johns & Lee Moder
    First Appearance: Stars & S.T.R.I.P.E. #0 (July 1999)
    Role: The Brat, Unpopular New Girl
    PL 7 (90)
    STRENGTH
    0/5 STAMINA 0/5 AGILITY 2/4
    FIGHTING 8 DEXTERITY 3
    INTELLIGENCE 0 AWARENESS -1 PRESENCE 1

    Skills:
    Acrobatics 4 (+6, +8)
    Athletics 4 (+4, +9 Belt)
    Deception 3 (+4)
    Ranged Combat (Shooting Stars) 1 (+7)
    Expertise (Pop Culture) 4 (+4)
    Perception 3 (+2)
    Stealth 1 (+5)

    Advantages:
    Improved Defense, Luck, Ranged Attack 3, Taunt

    Powers:
    "Cosmic Converter Belt" (Flaws: Removable) [36]
    Enhanced Strength 5 (10)
    Enhanced Stamina 5 (10)
    Enhanced Agility 2 (4)
    Enhanced Advantages 3: Diehard, Great Endurance, Power Attack (3)
    Leaping 1 (15 feet) (1)

    "Shooting Stars" Affliction 6 (Fort; Dazed/Stunned/Incapacitated) (Extras: Ranged, Multiattack) (Diminished Range -2) (16) -- (17)
    • AE: "Haywire Machines" Affliction 8 (Tech Skill of Creator; Dazed/Stunned/Incapacitated) (Extras: Ranged, Cumulative) (Flaws: Limited to Machines) (Dim. Range -2) (14)

    -- (45 points)

    Offense:
    Unarmed +8 (+0 Damage, DC 15)
    Converter Belt +8 (+5 Damage, DC 20)
    Shooting Stars +7 (+6 Ranged Affliction, DC 16)
    Initiative +2 (+4 Belt)

    Defenses:
    Dodge +6 (+8 Belt, DC 16-18), Parry +8 (DC 18), Toughness +0 (+5 Belt), Fortitude +2 (+7 Belt), Will +5

    Complications:
    Relationship (Pat Dugan, S.T.R.I.P.E.)- Courtney's stepfather Pat is family, but they don't really get along- she openly disrespects him, and rejects his attempts to settle her down.
    Relationship (Birth Father)- Courtney keeps thinking about the father that abandoned her family years ago. Despite him being a con-man, Courtney finds the idea of a runaway father fascinating.

    Total: Abilities: 26 / Skills: 20--10 / Advantages: 6 / Powers: 36 / Defenses: 12 (90)

    -Reading the original Stars & S.T.R.I.P.E. series is funny stuff as far as looking back on the character of Courtney Whitmore goes. Compared to the mature, reasonable young girl of today, she's a snide, arrogant little brat, frequently disrespectful not only to her hated stepfather Pat Dugan, but pretty much every adult in her vicinity. Idealizing her absentee birth-father, Courtney hates this new guy who's intruded into her life and force her to move to (ugh) Blue Valley, Nebraska. One day, she discovers the Cosmic Converter Belt in Pat's stuff, steals it while telling Pat "by the way... your costume SUCKED!", and she immediately gets into a ton of trouble.

    -The series is very odd... it's clearly made to appeal to teenage girls (the hero is a relatively flat-chested, skinny girl with braces- the iconic "This Character Is YOU" look), and has very cartoonish, exaggerated art. She has a mini-crush on a side character named Josh (your standard Bland Pretty Boy, also iconic to girl-focused features), and a school rival in "Shiv", who of course is the daughter of a super-villain, and a big fat guy as a bully as well. Problem is, the series only lasted a short while, and spent a bunch of time in the fighting, and too little on the character-stuff at school, which meant we never got additional information on Josh & the bully until the series was gone. Courtney's friend Mary was a little better, but even SHE went about a DECADE without being seen, appearing at Stargirl's birthday party in Johns' final JSA issue.

    -Courtney as a starting-out "Star-Spangled Kid" is a different ball of wax than what came later. This Courtney is less clever, pretty or skillful, and doesn't have the benefit of the Cosmic Rod either. She's a PL 7 who's nonetheless quite strong (in one issue she tears S.T.R.I.P.E.'s ARM off- and while that's a fragile damn piece of equipment, that's a pretty big feat), which is suprising to those who read JSA, where she's like twelfth in line for physical might. The Cosmic Converter Belt is actually a REALLY good Device, though, boosting all her physical stats, giving her moderate Super-Strength, and the "Shooting Stars", a Stunning Multiattack effect that can nullify people's senses, or make mechanical devices go haywire. Still, this Courtney is more lucky than good, and like a baseline rookie, is REALLY cheap an inefficient overall.




    These pictures are some of my favourite super-hero pictures of all time, by virtue of just how CUTE they are! WOOK AT HER, SHE'S SHO-O-O-O-O-O KYOOT!! You can actually picture a real teenaged girl looking like that- she's adorbz like a baby puppy or panda cub. Makes me feel all big-brothery and protective and crap. Totally amazing work. Dale Eaglesham- you rock.

    STARGIRL (Courtney Whitmore, aka The Star-Spangled Kid II)
    Created By:
    Geoff Johns & Lee Moder
    First Appearance: Stars and S.T.R.I.P.E. #0 (July 1999)
    Role: Kid Hero, Uppity Brat Turned Good
    Group Affiliations: The Justice Society of America
    PL 9 (143)
    STRENGTH
    0/5 STAMINA 1/5 AGILITY 4/5
    FIGHTING 9 DEXTERITY 3
    INTELLIGENCE 1 AWARENESS 2 PRESENCE 3

    Skills:
    Acrobatics 4 (+8)
    Athletics 4 (+4, +8 Belt)
    Deception 2 (+5)
    Expertise (Pop Culture) 4 (+5)
    Expertise (History) 2 (+3)
    Perception 2 (+4)
    Persuasion 4 (+7)
    Ranged Combat (Cosmic Stuff) 3 (+9)
    Stealth 1 (+5)

    Advantages:
    Evasion, Improved Critical (Cosmic Rod), Improved Defense, Quick Draw, Luck, Ranged Attack 3, Set-Up, Taunt, Teamwork

    Powers:
    "Cosmic Converter Belt" (Flaws: Removable) [33]
    Enhanced Strength 5 (10)
    Enhanced Stamina 4 (8)
    Enhanced Agility 1 (2)
    Enhanced Advantages 3: Diehard, Great Endurance, Power Attack (3)
    Leaping 1 (15 feet) (1)

    "Shooting Stars" Affliction 6 (Fort; Dazed/Stunned/Incapacitated) (Extras: Ranged, Multiattack) (Diminished Range -2) (16) -- (17)
    • AE: "Haywire Machines" Affliction 8 (Tech Skill of Creator; Dazed/Stunned/Incapacitated) (Extras: Ranged, Cumulative) (Flaws: Limited to Machines) (Dim. Range -2) (14)

    -- (41 points)

    "Cosmic Rod" (Flaws: Easily Removable) (Feats: Restricted 2, Remote Control) [26]
    Flight 7 (250 mph) (14)
    Movement 1 (Space Travel 1) (2)
    Immunity 1 (Atmospheric Effects) (1)
    Cosmic Blast 9 (18) -- (21)
    • AE: Dazzle Visuals 8 (16)
      AE: "Stabby Stick" Strength-Damage +3 (Feats: Reach 2) (5)
      AE: Environment 1 (Heat, Light) (2)

    -- (38 points)

    Offense:
    Unarmed +9 (+0 Damage, DC 15)
    Cosmic Blast +9 (+9 Ranged Damage, DC 24)
    Dazzle Visuals +9 (+8 Ranged Affliction, DC 18)
    Shooting Stars +9 (+6 Ranged Affliction, DC 16)
    Haywire Machines +9 (+8 Ranged Affliction, DC 18)
    Initiative +4 (+5 Cosmic Belt)

    Defenses:
    Dodge +9 (+10 CCB, DC 20), Parry +10 (DC 20), Toughness +1 (+5 Belt), Fortitude +3 (+7 Belt), Will +8

    Complications:
    Responsibility (The Legacies of Sylvester Pemberton & Ted Knight)- She wears the Converter Belt of the original Star-Spangled Kid, and wields the Cosmic Rod of Ted & Jack Knight, effectively holding onto two legacies.
    Relationship (Mother Paula, Stepfather Pat Dugan, Stepbrother Mike & Baby Sister Patricia)- Courtney and Pat got off on the wrong foot (with her deliberately trying to divorce him and her mom), but they later came to terms. Courtney, in the end, loves her family and will fight to the death to protect them. Even Mike.
    Relationship (Albert Rothstein- Atom Smasher)- Al was the only JSA member to not treat Courtney like a dumb kid, and she soon grew very attached to him. This eventually blossomed into love, though Al soon turned his back on the JSA and joined Black Adam. Al would later deny loving her, even though it was plainly obvious to everyone that he did- when some stuff with Johnny Sorrow happened, they took a break and kept their distance. Then continuity ended.
    Relationship (Billy Batson- Captain Marvel)- The two had an adorable relationship in JSA, with him feeling like he's special around her just as Billy. He was her first love, and her first broken heart- he left her to avoid giving up his secret identity to Jay Garrick.
    Enemy (Shiv)- The daughter of The Dragon King was the ranking Alpha Bitch of Courtney's High School- they were soon enemies for realz, though Courtney soon lapped her in competence.
    Courtney started out as a brat, but now she's come to take her new family as if it were her original one. Even Mike, who is an ass. She's devoted enough to them that when they are murdered by Per Degaton's forces, she breaks the "No Killing" rule she holds so dear.
    Responsibility (Team Leader of the JSA's Younger Generation)- Courtney is considered the "teacher" of the new generation of JSA kids.

    Total: Abilities: 46 / Skills: 26--13 / Advantages: 11 / Powers: 59 / Defenses: 14 (143)

    -Warning: this rant's as long as my Atom Smasher one was .

    -With her inclusion on the JSA, Courtney became quite blessed, especially once her creator, Geoff Johns (who based her off of his own sister Courtney- a teen girl who died in a plane crash years before), fully took over the series. She gave the team some much-needed youth and perspective, so it wasn't just a bunch of old guys hanging around, reminiscing about old times. She was cute (in like, a KID way, not a sexy girl way- she was actually drawn non-sexually), funny, and had some extra-special qualities about her. Rather than dress like a stripper and pack gigantic knockers, Stargirl wore a midriff-baring top as her skimpiest article of clothing, and she looks like a pretty teenager with a normal slim build. During every single JSA arc, she stands out- she was brave, but not TOO brave; she admired the older JSAers, but carved her own path anyways; she was rebellious, but she smacked around Jakeem Thunder for talking lip to Mr. Terrific. She was so perfect that the other characters could only talk about how much potential she had, which could veer DANGEROUSLY into Mary Sue territory (especially when Johns based her off of his late sister), but they kept her above the level by making sure she was never TOO smart or TOO powerful (in fact, she's one of the worst members of the team in a scrap). In the end, she is still a fairly young kid.

    (NOTE: THIS PART'S ABOUT SHIPPING. SKIP TO THE NEXT BIT IF Y'ALL DON'T LIKE THAT)
    -And then there's the whole Atom Smasher/Captain Marvel thing. See, while she was quickly pushed away from the Young Justice crowd (as that team did its own thing), she did a lot of hanging around with the older hero Albert Rothstein, himself a young kid to the JSA elders. He was nice, respectful, and didn't talk down to her. A few issues implied some feelings on Courtney's part (especially the end of the Extant story, where a future Courtney narrates the story while being married to Al), but we never quite got how serious they were at first. Then, Al (who'd killed Extant to save his mother- she'd been killed by the terrorist Kobra) quit the team after believing Black Adam's assertions that the team was too easy on criminals.

    -So while Stargirl was heartbroken over that, she fell swiftly into the arms of one Billy Batson, aka Captain Marvel, upon discovering his secret identity (and true age). This relationship was a SUPER-CUTE heart-warming affair, with Billy feeling good around what was basically the nicest girl ever by this point (losing just about all of the rebellious attitude of her early years). This went on for only a short couple trades (including Black Reign, the JSA's master-stroke of storytelling, featuring her & Al have a few heart-to-hearts about his betrayal of the team in between him knocking her unconscious), until Jay Garrick added up all the flirting and hints she & Billy were showing, and put the kibosh on it (the pervy old man in Billy's head wouldn't let him just admit to The Flash that Marvel was as old as Courtney was). The image of Courtney, bawling her eyes out, alone in her room, is one of the most emotionally-torquing scenes in the JSA's entire run.

    -This brings us to the Per Degaton storyline. Showing classic Geoff Johns-level familial violence, her entire family is gunned down in front of her, sending her into a firestorm of despair. Being forced to team up with Atom Smasher again, as the JSA runs back into the past to save their mentors and forebears, only makes it worse, as she utterly SNAPS at him when he says "now you know how I felt" (DICK MOVE, ALBERT ROTHSTEIN). But by the story's end, she kind of understands where he was coming from before, and she openly worries about Al in front of the whole team (and Captain Marvel), when they fly to Kahndaq to help Al & Black Adam face The Spectre (doing one of his weekly "I'm controlled by evil!" rampages). Poor C*ck-Blocked Billy tries to interject, and Stargirl rejects him, and then Power Girl (herself pulling a Mama Bear on the younger heroine- and recognizing Courtney's feelings for Al) SNAPS at Billy, telling him off.

    -And here's where things regarding Courtney/Al get interesting: By this point, it's fairly obvious she likes him (Billy as much accused her of it during Black Reign anyways). But when he sacrifices his life, willingly letting The Spectre kill him, rather than hurt the people of Kahndaq anymore, you see the depth of her feelings: Courtney absolutely loses it, crying over Al's dead body. NOW you know she truly loves Al. He is saved thanks to Black Adam (in one of the more emotional scenes in the series, as Adam can't stand the thought of his "brother" dying), but willingly goes to jail to serve his time in the name of "Justice". Courtney makes a promise- she'll "be THERE for him" when he gets out.

    -Fast-forward to the last year or so of books: Al is finally back on the JSA, moping about how Billy "Deserves Courtney more than I EVER could" while they fight Black Adam AGAIN, and Billy & Stargirl nearly share a kiss (NOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!), but by story's end, Billy is off with his sister doing whatever the hell DC was doing with Captain Marvel back then (seriously- has any hero's handling made less sense?), and Courtney smiles at Al. With Geoff Johns' final issue, we figure out that Courtney still likes Atom Smasher (when her friend Mary calls her on it, and all Court can manage is a weak denial), and in Jerry Ordway's filler-arc, even Power Girl is just telling that giant idiot to just GET WITH HER ALREADY. By this point, it's PATENTLY obvious both are head-over-heels in love, but then we get a good-old-fashioned Comic Book Break-Up, as the JSA elders, feeling protective (and noting the age difference), force Al to let her down easy, telling her he loves her "like a sister". Courtney doesn't believe it any more than WE do, but ultimately, the age issue, and Al's questionable standing with the public given his history as a mass-murderer, split them apart.

    -Alas, things weren't meant to be- Matt Sturges started work on JSA All-Stars, and wrote a story in which Johnny Sorrow imitated Al in order to win "True Love's First Kiss" to allow the King of Tears to inhabit the mortal plane. This resulted in a HUGE tease that saw Court & Al finally kiss, but the big reveal was telegraphed early and put into the next issue. Of course, most fans pretty much prefered the Court/Billy pairing (Sturges & Bill Willingham said that was flat-out the most-common thing they had fans ask them about when they took the series over from Geoff Johns), but I WAS SAD, DAMMIT.

    -So yeah, that's a relatively simple love story, huh? I know Marvel's a more popular character, so Billy/Courtney "Shippers" have more say, but damn it, the Courtney/Al thing is just SO fascinating (even if it's kind of a retread of the old Kitty/Colossus story, which in itself was AWESOME... though both have that weird "adult male falls in love with a tiny teenage girl" thing that is WAY outside of my normal interests), I can't help but totally support it, and I wish they'd just GET TOGETHER, already! She would have been at least seventeen by the end of Standard DC Continuity (She was sixteen BEFORE One Year Later, and celebrated a birthday after that, though most everyone ignored the time-jump pretty quickly) everyone older and she's not eighteen yet).

    (THIS PART ISN'T ABOUT SHIPPING)
    -So, uh, where was I? Oh yeah! Courtney's an awesome character. She's a mega-favourite with girl readers for good reason- cute and spunky, brave but not a Scrappy-Doo (who annoyed people by laughing off and threatening every menace), and she actually feels emotions like a NORMAL PERSON. The greatest Little Sister character I've ever seen, and one of comics' best teen characters (or just characters PERIOD) ever made. The fact that she's not a major powerhouse makes her more likeable in a world of Kryptonian-level guys, and her teeny-tiny build, mixed with the outfit and the braces, makes for the most ENDEARING character in history- she looks like a cute kid instead of someone's fantasy, like Supergirl, Power Girl and others tend to be (not that there's anything WRONG with such fantasies- you're talking to the world's biggest Thundra fan, here). It totally makes sense that the rest of the JSA recruits look up to her (particularly obsessively in Maxine's case). Between her, Cyclone and Atom Smasher, JSA had my favourite line-up just about all-time in comics.

    -Courtney, now boosted by a whole bunch of extra stuff, is now an over-pointed PL 9 (143) build, which I think makes sense. I've never been comfortable with her as a PL 10 (much less the insane PL 11 from the DCA book, which makes NO sense), because she's never been shown doing very powerful stuff (the most powerful stunt I've EVER seen her do was blow off a guy's arm and through the side of her house, and that's in "Aunt May Mode" after some thugs murdered her family).

    -What she ends up looking like is a moderately athletic kid, boosted to near-peak human stats with her Cosmic Converter Belt (though she's not doing Cap or Spidey-level damage- she can barely K.O. most Mooks with her fists, and her biggest power-feat ever is lifting a bunch of Mooks off of her), and carrying an additional weapon, the Cosmic Rod, which has TOTALLY replaced her Stunning Shooting Stars as her weapon of choice. The Rod had Telekinetic & Force Field powers under Jack Knight, but Courtney has NEVER shown them during any issue I've ever read (and I've read them all, at least in JSA), so I didn't put them in. The Belt is actually lower-level than it was when she was starting out, as her baseline stats have caught up a little better (So she's just as powerful, but less dependent on the Belt). Courtney's fairly experienced for a teenage superhero, and is basically at that cusp when a character becomes PL 10. Maybe one day she could have gotten there.
    Last edited by Jabroniville; 02-21-2015 at 02:21 PM.

  8. #4278
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    Re: Jab's Builds!

    I was a tremendous JSA fan-I loved the series, almost until the end (Bill Willingham-a great writer of Fables and the late,lamented Elementals didn't really get the characters,and then the JSA All-Stars split further weakened BOTH titles). You could tell the various authors of the book really were genuinely interested in the characters, giving them their best showings in ages-Atom Smasher, Black Adam, Hawkman and Hawkgirl, Dr. Midnite III, the original GL, Mr.Terrific II, Stargirl...I wanted that title to go on and on. Alas, it was not to be-and not even the Mutliversity title has restored a proper setting for the Justice Society to inhabit.

    I never read more than an issue or two of Stars and S.T.R.I.P.E., so I wasn't as familiar with the earlier version of Stargirl/Courtney, though she did exhibit some of the snottier, less respectful attitude in JSA prior to Johns' taking over the title-mocking some of the JSA's trophies from earlier cases, not being interested in the Star-Spangled Kid's legacy, mocking the original Maxine Hunkel Red Tornado.

    So Alan Scott lost his book to his canine sidekick? Man, nearly all the Golden Age superheroes DID fall hard after the war years, didn't they? I read the Spectre ended up being a sort of "guardian angel" to a comic-relief character "Percival Pop, the Super-Cop", the original Daredevil lost his title to his own team of kid sidekicks The Little Wiseguys, and Black Hood and the Shield "introduced" a new teen humor character-a young red-headed fellow named Archie-who soon took over their book and then the entire MLJ comic line.

    You know, about ten years back at Wizard World Chicago, I attended a panel with Erik Larsen (who in person is funny and charming, though the ONLY thing he's written with any success is Savage Dragon); he talked about why the Big Two comics really almost never feature lasting, significant change in their comics due to commercial reasons. A question was asked about why Marvel seemed to defy that early on, with the heroes and villains having life-altering events, dying for good, changing allegiances and so forth up until about the end of the Bronze Age, but then changed to a status quo company. Larsen noted that Stan Lee, the original prime-mover of the MU, NEVER expected the characters to last more than ten or fifteen years MAXIMUM-he was a teenager during the Golden Age, which saw super-heroes born in the late 1930s, peak during the WW II years, then peter-out during the early 1950s, with the exception of cultural icons Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman (and yes, she's a cultural icon, she just hasn't been a big hit in comics for the past twenty years). So Lee felt totally comfortable allowing real change, since he figured the Marvel heroes had a limited shelf life. When it became clear they would be successful for decades, the mandate became "freezing them in place" so as not to jeopardize sales.

    All my best.

  9. #4279
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    Re: Jab's Builds!

    Quote Originally Posted by greycrusader View Post
    So Alan Scott lost his book to his canine sidekick?
    Streak the Wonder Dog. What a bitch? Or maybe not. I think Streak may have been a boy dog.

  10. #4280
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    Golden Age Amazing Man



    AMAZING MAN I (Will Everett)
    Created By:
    Roy Thomas & Jerry Ordway
    First Appearance: All-Star Squadron #23 (July 1983)
    Role: DC's "First" Black Hero
    Group Affiliations: The All-Star Squadron
    PL 8 (115)
    STRENGTH
    3 STAMINA 4 AGILITY 5
    FIGHTING 8 DEXTERITY 3
    INTELLIGENCE 0 AWARENESS 2 PRESENCE 1

    Skills:
    Acrobatics 8 (+13)
    Athletics 10 (+13)
    Deception 2 (+3)
    Expertise (Athlete) 8 (+13) -- Uses Agility
    Intimidation 3 (+4)
    Perception 2 (+4)

    Advantages:
    Interpose, Ranged Attack 2

    Powers:
    "Object Mimicry" Variable (Powers Related to Materials) 6 (Flaws: Limited to Objects He's Touched) [36]

    Sample Form: Metal (ST 8, Protection +4- Impervious 7, Increased Mass)

    Offense:
    Unarmed +8 (+3 Damage, DC 18)
    Steel or Brick Form +8 (+8 Damage, DC 23)
    Initiative +4

    Defenses:
    Dodge +8 (DC 18), Parry +8 (DC 18), Toughness +4 (+8 Metal/Stone Form), Fortitude +6, Will +6

    Complications:
    Prejudice (Black)- Will Everett, despite his Olympic acumen, is a black man living in 1940s America, and is thus forcibly-separated from whites in many places. His background and schooling were poorer as well, and he faces many prejudices.

    Total: Abilities: 52 / Skills: 30--15 / Advantages: 3 / Powers: 36 / Defenses: 9 (115)

    -Will Everett is a tribute to Sub-Mariner creator Bill Everett and his own "Amazing Man" Golden Age character (later used as the basis for John Aman- The Prince of Orphans over at Marvel), only altered from a generic Mr. Terrific-type rennaissance man to a black Olympian with object mimicry (aka "Absorbing Man") powers. Roy Thomas got a double-whammy out of this one in his retroactively inserted All-Star Squadron member: He got an "Amazing Man" onto the team, fulfilling yet ANOTHER obscure GA character (though in different form), and he got to show a black hero in the 1940s, certainly a rare thing given the era, and how the world and the team would've dealt with it. I never personally read any of his appearances, but I'm guessing alot of "We heroes are way above the morality of the age and don't mind one bit" with the exception of a few heroes, who of course learn better as the story goes on. But hey, there's nothing wrong with that- it's the Golden Age, after all, and the heroes WERE supposed to be the paragons of a moral humanity. None of them were Alabama senators, in any case.

    -Amazing Man here is an Olympic athlete that was reduced to janitorial duty in his post-athletic career, but got into an accident at the lab he was cleaning, and gained super-powers. He was briefly employed by The Ultra-Humanite, but turned on him after being exposed to the members of the All-Star Squadron. He actually has powers that are remarkably "modern" in that aside from the generic tough guys & fire-blasters of the era, he's got stuff that wouldn't be seen for twenty years in real comics time. He is later explained to be a major name in the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s, fighting against segregation- he even captured James Earl Ray- the murderer of Martin Luther King, Jr.! Unfortunately, his sole legacies are some pretty forgettable characters.

    -Amazing Man comes to a pretty high points total, having one of the more expensive powers in M&M. I was unsure of his total power levels, but I'll stick to him having decent Attack & Defense, with a PL 8 to make up for boosts via mimicking Steel (Density) or something.

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