Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Find Pyramid Tests Confusing.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Find Pyramid Tests Confusing.

    Just not getting how the tests are used and progress from the info in the book (Assembled). Can anyone help me with this?

  • #2
    Re: Find Pyramid Tests Confusing.

    Originally posted by Thanos007 View Post
    Just not getting how the tests are used and progress from the info in the book (Assembled). Can anyone help me with this?
    So no one else understands them either?

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Find Pyramid Tests Confusing.

      There aren't that many Icons players who post here, so its more likely no one who does and understands them has cared enough to post. Note the overall activity level on this sub-board.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Find Pyramid Tests Confusing.

        Well, actually, I have collected the range of printed material (both Ad Infinitum and Fainting Goat Games), and do enjoy both reading and playing the game considerably - especially so, since the system has dispensed with the rather (understatement) problematic Damage/Toughness chart and the feats. I would submit the following regarding my understanding on pyramid tests:

        A particular problem the PCs have been handed requires a Massive Success on a test. The outcome, given the difficulty assigned (say a 12 on 2d6), is pretty much impossible on a single roll for the character/s. However, the GM indicates they can do this in stages; thus the designation of a pyramid test. The players need to roll a 6 for a Minimum Success; 7-8 for Moderate; 9-10 for Major, and 11-12 for Massive, using Determination to try to put things back on track if the raw dice rolls screw up. The players roll a 7 or 8; they've achieved one degree of the success necessary, leaving two more to overcome. If they rolled a 9/10, they'd have achieved two of the levels needed, but are still one short. On the next roll, they (hopefully) pull off a 7/8 or a 9/10, which will finish the test successfully. Based on my understanding and reading of the rules, if a 6 was rolled, the test isn't failed by any means, but there's no contribution to achieving the final success level either - although a beneficent GM (which I would do) would perhaps give the next roll a +1 bonus. Once three Moderate, two Major or one Major plus one Moderate success were achieved sequentially, the test would be completed successfully - i.e., as long as the total equals Moderate Success x3, meaning three +1s (or a combination thereof) on the 2d6 outcomes.

        There are, as I believe is mentioned the Assembled Edition, several dramatic devices the GM could use to ratchet up the "Uh-Oh" factor on this: put a time limit that has to be beaten, number of tests that can be made before the nuclear weapon (which the villain has left as a doomsday device in the event that he/she/it was taken out; the nuclear weapon that James Bond tries to disarm in Goldfinger could represent the basics of this sort of situation) goes off, or that any failed roll will result in a speeding up of the clock (number of rounds to go/number of attempts to be made is reduced), or that a failed roll results in another threat being released on the PCs, which they have to deal with on top of getting the damned nuclear weapon disarmed in time. And so on. As the GM in such a situation, I'd be cranking the mood music for this scenario and making it clear, through description, that the players are up against The Ticking Clock (Act IV of the dramatic arc), and using narrative to describe how their relative successes/failures on the route to trying to get this thing solved are putting serious weights on them.

        Although M&M 2e might make room for this sort of problem imposition, I don't recall reading anything about such (although it has been a while). ICONS, with the pyramid tests, provided what I felt was a nice but purely optional dramatic standpoint for the GM to work the players through; I hope that this attempt to outline a definition of the situation and provide an illustration of employment has been successful.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Find Pyramid Tests Confusing.

          Originally posted by Thanos007 View Post
          Just not getting how the tests are used and progress from the info in the book (Assembled). Can anyone help me with this?
          Black Talon’s response is great. I wrote about pyramid tests on my blog:

          http://jhmcmullen.blogspot.ca/2017/0...tests.html?m=1
          Some M&M stuff at my blog, [URL="http://jhmcmullen.blogspot.ca"][i]Iconic Energy[/i][/URL], but mostly [i]ICONS[/i]

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Find Pyramid Tests Confusing.

            Should have made a point here a bit earlier, but just in case Thanos007 (or anyone else) is still reading this over: I messed up a bit with regard to the pyramid test progression. While the example provided would, in fact, be applicable under certain GM designed circumstances, the baseline demonstration would function as follows.

            A Massive success is required on a test. However, and as given in the previous example, the odds of getting a 12 on a single - and first-out-of-the-gate - roll are pretty damn low. Hence, a pyramid test, where success can be accumulated in stages. The progression follows: getting a Moderate success (7-8, presuming 6 is Minimal success) is the first stage in completion. A second Moderate outcome will add to become a single Major success. Now, two more Moderate successes are required, so that two Major successes equal one Massive. Again, as previously noted, it could be the case that a single hero will apply him- or herself to this, or several characters will work - separately or together, or a combination of both - in order to get those four Moderates (successes, not politicians). From a mathematical formula standpoint, the issue could be stated like this,

            Moderate success + Moderate = Major
            Moderate + Moderate = Major
            Major + Major = Massive

            Which concludes the test successfully.

            I hope that this clarification has provided some benefit. Again, as stated on pages 26-28 of the Assembled Edition, there are a raft of variations that can be introduced to make the pyramid test more difficult, a bit easier, a bit of both, or just to throw some spice in to how it operates. Hope to hear back from the ICONS crew, and that a couple of other people picked up "Santa Claus vs. the Metaskulks", which formed a bit of my self-given Christmas (and I did get it on December 25) gift.

            Comment

            Working...
            X