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Running the adventures as con-modules

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  • Running the adventures as con-modules

    I'm attending a con fairly soon, and was considering to run one or two sessions of The Expanse.

    I've run the QS adventure, but my experience was that it took significantly longer than a standard 4-hour con session - could be several reasons for that of course, and I guess I could cram it into a 4 hour slot with more railroading.

    If you've run any of the three exisiting adventures, how long did each one take, and which of the three exisitng pre-made adventures would fit re-working for a 4 hour game?
    "The heart of the gambler's fallacy is a misconception of the fairness of the laws of chance. The gambler feels that the fairness of the coin entitles him to expect that any deviation in one direction will soon be cancelled by a corresponding deviation in the other. Even the fairest of coins, however, given the limitations of its memory and moral sense, cannot be as fair as the gambler expects it to be. This fallacy is not unique to gamblers. ... This expectation can be justified only by the belief that a random process is self-correcting. Idioms such as "errors cancel each other out" reflect the image of an active self-correcting process. Some familiar processes in nature obey such laws: a deviation from a stable equilibrium produces a force that restores the equilibrium. The laws of chance, in contrast, do not work that way: deviations are not cancelled as sampling proceeds, they are merely diluted." Kahneman and Tversky (1971)

  • #2
    Re: Running the adventures as con-modules

    "Cup-bearer" is a great adventure to run for beginners, and we did it in less than 4 hours.
    But, I took some time before to let the players choose their pre-generated character and also said a few words about the game system and the background for the pair that wasn't a fan of the series already. I don't know if you can afford so much time if you run the adventure at a convention.
    Thomas Trolljaeger
    Du plomb dans le virtuel
    Caution, contains french gibberish and nonsense.

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    • #3
      Re: Running the adventures as con-modules

      So I ran Cupbearer on Friday at the con.

      Easily done in under 4 hours, lots of fun, and surprisingly no combat. They managed to avoid it all, and make smart decisions. The Churn only cam to about 17 or 19 - nothing was activated at 10 Churn.
      "The heart of the gambler's fallacy is a misconception of the fairness of the laws of chance. The gambler feels that the fairness of the coin entitles him to expect that any deviation in one direction will soon be cancelled by a corresponding deviation in the other. Even the fairest of coins, however, given the limitations of its memory and moral sense, cannot be as fair as the gambler expects it to be. This fallacy is not unique to gamblers. ... This expectation can be justified only by the belief that a random process is self-correcting. Idioms such as "errors cancel each other out" reflect the image of an active self-correcting process. Some familiar processes in nature obey such laws: a deviation from a stable equilibrium produces a force that restores the equilibrium. The laws of chance, in contrast, do not work that way: deviations are not cancelled as sampling proceeds, they are merely diluted." Kahneman and Tversky (1971)

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      • #4
        Re: Running the adventures as con-modules

        And since there was no combat, you couldn't even use the churn pool to make players guns jam...
        So sad for the GM.

        But on the other hand, you got a smart group, this is as good as gold.
        Tell us if you can afford the time : how did the adventure unfold ?
        How did they get what was going on ?
        Pinkwater, APE or the local gang boss, who won them over ?
        Did Ade Akintola do all the talking ?
        Who ate the delicacies from the 57-D warehouse ?
        Did the Sommelier left Ganymede with Addy still snoring under a table at La Cage's ?
        Thomas Trolljaeger
        Du plomb dans le virtuel
        Caution, contains french gibberish and nonsense.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Running the adventures as con-modules

          First off POTENTIAL SPOILER ALERT! If you intend to be a player in this adventure read no further.
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          Second, it was a pick-up game, late in the evening, and hardly properly prepared. A spur of the moment kind of thing. As it was late, details escape me (and I may recount some parts wrongly), but this is the general gist of it.

          The adventurers arrived at Ganymede with only the intro text and the lead concerning the access codes to go on. While most went to the La Cage, Izzy went to do some hacking of local networks to investigate.

          At the La Cage Nico and Ade spent copious amount of money (i.e. good income tests) trying to get information about Kai, they succeeded in getting information about Aquilo's possessive streak. Addy impressed everyone in the bar by drinking copious amounts of alcohol without falling unconscious by the effort.

          Izzy's player rolled some really good rolls, so more leads and clues were unearthed due to stunt points and good thinking. Izzy found information about Aquilo (which were supplemented by the character's successful bribing and social rolls at La Cage), and they had some information about Moneta.

          They met up at D57, four characters went in to explore and got trapped. Ade and Nico stayed outside and were approached by some thugs, trying to scare them off. Things changed when Izzy and Addy quickly manage to open the doors again, suddenly thugs were outnumbered. Confronting them and asking leading questions concerning Kai - and with some good rolls by Ade's player - they managed to talk the thugs into "getting back to them" concerning this missing person.

          So far, no weapons, no fighting, just a bit of posturing.

          Izzy goes back to the ship with Nico and Casey (I believe), to dock with and steal the Amalthea Ambrosial cargo - as it doesn't "exist" anymore.

          Meanwhile, Ade, Addy and Chao, starts looking for Aquilo. In short order they find his little hole in the wall, and talk their way past guards, giving up weapons, and being respectful. Gently pumping Aquilo for information about Kai's whereabouts, their history, and who could've taken him from Aquilo, they enter into an alliance - he will compensate them for figuring out where Kai is and help get him back to Aquilo.

          Meanwhile the rest of the crew manages to easily dock their ship, with fake codes, and steal the cargo. Izzy starts to look for Kai on security cam feeds - challenge test.

          Nico and Casey meet up with the rest as they leave Aquilo's office.

          While Izzy is figuring out that the connection with the shipment, Kai and Moneta, the crew gets a call for a meeting with Moneta.

          In short this meeting was the longest scene, lots of back and forth, negotiations, and a point where Ade's player had to re-roll (twice - a Con power enabled a second re-roll, related to the theme of the con, check it out: Gamernation Con), but they managed to get a deal to distribute and share profits from the shipment, and "only" giving 30% of their payment to Moneta. Moneta's people would also provide support in case Aquilo's people showed up in the docks before the crew, to protect/distract.

          Chao's player (I believe) became one of two key players in avoiding combat while transporting Kai back to the ship. Avoiding all usual pathways and tunnels, he took the crew on a potentially perilous route through old access tunnels and lead them to a narrow access tunnel some 70 metres from their ship. This is where key player number two, Nico's player, rolled a good perception and spent some stunt point cretively: identifying the presence of at least 6 of Aquilo's men, plus some of Moneta's, and Pinkwater security, the player also discovered a small car/cart, that just about could hold 6 individuals. All aboard, they sped through the throng of people - not hitting anyone (by this point the Churn was at 17 or 18) - and spending stunt points to jump off something like a ramp, they landed where they needed to and got into the ship before anyone could pull any weapons.

          Kai never asked where they were going, as the players asked him about ideas where to go ... and they lied decently when treading on line.

          At this point, there could of course have been space combat, difficulties getting away (like docking clamps - which they had talked Moneta into keeping disabled) and some hacking-combat-like encounter, but it was past 1 am, after a 16 hour day of gaming, so I called it, and described the end, their new allies, their new nemesis, and the destruction of the massive mirrors ... Kai could do little about being taken home, but made some believable threats about what he would do to the players (and their families) once he was in charge.
          Last edited by GMLovlie; 10th April 2019, 04:56 AM.
          "The heart of the gambler's fallacy is a misconception of the fairness of the laws of chance. The gambler feels that the fairness of the coin entitles him to expect that any deviation in one direction will soon be cancelled by a corresponding deviation in the other. Even the fairest of coins, however, given the limitations of its memory and moral sense, cannot be as fair as the gambler expects it to be. This fallacy is not unique to gamblers. ... This expectation can be justified only by the belief that a random process is self-correcting. Idioms such as "errors cancel each other out" reflect the image of an active self-correcting process. Some familiar processes in nature obey such laws: a deviation from a stable equilibrium produces a force that restores the equilibrium. The laws of chance, in contrast, do not work that way: deviations are not cancelled as sampling proceeds, they are merely diluted." Kahneman and Tversky (1971)

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Running the adventures as con-modules

            Smart players indeed, decieving almost everyone. They made some powerful ennemies, there, though. I hope they kept their word about the 30% revolutionary fee, or they are going to have some problems soon.
            Mine adopted a more violent approach, going against Aquilo, culminating in an all-out fight in a trap laid by Moneta, and were ultimately saved by Pinkwater, whith whom they (mostly unknowingly) cooperated. They were clever with the Dardanus family, delivering Kai on Titan, but secretly agreeing to organize a new escape with him soon.
            In the end, they left no (living) ennemies behind. Good for them, they are going to go back to Ganymède soon.
            Thomas Trolljaeger
            Du plomb dans le virtuel
            Caution, contains french gibberish and nonsense.

            Comment


            • #7
              I've run The Ganymede Insurance Job twice now at local store demos - both times, the groups have wrapped it up in under 4 hrs, included the optional side gig. Both went heavier on planning and light on combat, but the Job seems doable in a 4 hr slot either way.

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              • #8
                Going to be running To Sleep, Perchance to Dream (from The Expanse Core Rulebook) later today, so we'll see how that does in a ~ 4 hr time slot. I am hopeful (and looking forward to it).

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