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Spaceship Combat Rules Clarification

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  • Spaceship Combat Rules Clarification

    Hi

    In the rules for Spaceship combat in Chapter 6, in the section on High G maneuvers (Maneuvering phase), it talks about adding the chosen High G bonus to the maneuvering test. Is this the same test as the one outlined beforehand for maintaining range from an enemy ship or is it a different test?

    Also, does it apply the High G evasive maneuver penalty to the ship's evasion test in the defence step?

    Many thanks

  • #2
    I believe the High-G manoeuvring you can do during the Maneuvers phase and the Defensive actions pahse are separate actions - so the bonus doesn't carry over. If that is what you're asking.

    But yes, the the bonus from High-G during maneuver phase applies to range maintenance/changes. That's kind of the point - it provides the pilot with a bonus, while forcing anyone on the ship to make a Constitution (Stamina) check.

    And then you can choose to perform High-G as part of an evasion too, but doing one doesn't mean have you to do the other. Of course, if my interpretation is correct, this means that doing both is pretty taxing on the crew. Which is should be.

    I assume they are two separate actions, due to the wording under the High-G maneuvering entry under Defensive Actions; it compares this to the maneuvering phase, but it is - to me - clear that they are two distinct and separate actions.
    "The heart of the gambler's fallacy is a misconception of the fairness of the laws of chance. The gambler feels that the fairness of the coin entitles him to expect that any deviation in one direction will soon be cancelled by a corresponding deviation in the other. Even the fairest of coins, however, given the limitations of its memory and moral sense, cannot be as fair as the gambler expects it to be. This fallacy is not unique to gamblers. ... This expectation can be justified only by the belief that a random process is self-correcting. Idioms such as "errors cancel each other out" reflect the image of an active self-correcting process. Some familiar processes in nature obey such laws: a deviation from a stable equilibrium produces a force that restores the equilibrium. The laws of chance, in contrast, do not work that way: deviations are not cancelled as sampling proceeds, they are merely diluted." Kahneman and Tversky (1971)

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    • #3
      I took it that you make one roll at the manoeuvre phase but can use the bonus at either the manoeuvre or defence roll.

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      • #4
        You could be right about that.

        "The heart of the gambler's fallacy is a misconception of the fairness of the laws of chance. The gambler feels that the fairness of the coin entitles him to expect that any deviation in one direction will soon be cancelled by a corresponding deviation in the other. Even the fairest of coins, however, given the limitations of its memory and moral sense, cannot be as fair as the gambler expects it to be. This fallacy is not unique to gamblers. ... This expectation can be justified only by the belief that a random process is self-correcting. Idioms such as "errors cancel each other out" reflect the image of an active self-correcting process. Some familiar processes in nature obey such laws: a deviation from a stable equilibrium produces a force that restores the equilibrium. The laws of chance, in contrast, do not work that way: deviations are not cancelled as sampling proceeds, they are merely diluted." Kahneman and Tversky (1971)

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        • #5
          I play it that they are two separate instances.

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