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  • What does FAGE do really well?

    So, I'm still not sure which system I want to use for my next big campaign ... FantasyAge, RuneQuest6, The One Ring and Fate are on the table, which are all vastly different.

    After my first playtest, I tried to figure out what FAGE actually does very good - and where, from my subjective perspective, its weak points may lie.

    The big selling points are definitely the stunts - I like retroactively applying special effects to actions; it is so much more neat than declaring them in advance, then taking a penalty on the roll and then failing the roll anyway so that nothing happens.
    Also along that lines, a combat thing: I like that the to-hit chance against most opponents is pretty high from the get-go. Nothing more annoying than if fighters keep missing each other (the exception being RuneQuest, where this is actually quite suspenseful since the first real hit often means that the fight is over).

    I also like that you roll up characters (even though there is a point-buy option) - however, this can be bug or feature, depending on whether you already have a specific concept in mind (better use point-buy) or whether you want to just dive into it and let yourself be inspired by your dice rolls (use rolling up). The advice in the rule-book is a little sketchy on that, suggesting that you should come up with a concept first and then making rolling your stats the default method. Among beginners, this is certain to create some frustration ...

    What I also like is the overall simplicity of always using attributes+foci for tests.

    Finally, I really like the magic system. It is simple and has enough room to characterize lots of different types of wizards/magicians/witches/clerics. The caveat being the very inflexible classes, which are a more general thing: There's just no wriggling room there. If, for example, you wan't to play a shaman (mage) from a primitve society who fights with an obsidian dagger ... well, he simply can't get the light blades weapons group. Never ever. So you would have to put up with nerfing yourself or otherwise take a staff after all (sigh). Or you would just have to break the rules and take light blades instead of staff - which wouldn't be much of a problem, but why not write such options into the rules in the first place? Similar thing goes for rogues: If I wan't to play a D'Artagnan type rogue, why can't I get the duelist weapon group from the start? Instead I have to wait until I can get the duelist specialization. So I start out as D'Artagnan with a short sword, and then, on level four, I can finally be D'Artagnan with a rapier. Or if I want to play a warrior belonging to a religious order who may have access to just one fitting set of arcana ...
    What I frankly don't get about this is that the system is simple and flexible enough at its core to accomodate suuch combinations without breaking the balance (at least, it looks that way to me). So why not add some options or at least encourage players to customize? That doesn't make a game much more complicated necessarily (look at Savage Worlds or Ubiquity, both pretty simple and pretty flexible in that regard). Well, I have high hopes that the FAGE Companion and Blue Rose might provide more options.

    What I also don't like so much:
    The big HP cushion. This is a thing that I also have with D&D and most games somehow derived from it: Why the hell make it so that combat drags out once you hit the higher levels? I actually felt that combat was even dragged out on the first level (okay, I had seven PCs and ten opponents, so that as a factor ...). But okay, I'm probably on the extreme end on this - after three or four rounds of combat, I usually just have enough (hence, RuneQuest). It also makes imagining some of the events in narrative terms very hard (our gnome Rogue shooting an opponent two times point-blank with his pistols, hitting both times and creating stunt points for armor penetration and extra damage, and the opponent - a normal human warrior by the way - still standing with half his HP ... the only explanation being that the rogue didn't quite hit after all). The rules say that HP are an abstract measure, but that abstractness occasionally colldies with the more concrete character of the rest of the rules. To put it differently, if FAGA, like e.g. Fate, would model everything fairly abstract, I wouldn't have a problem with coming up with a narrative explanation for why that warrior isn't down after he's been shot at two times; but I feel that FAGE doesn't leave enough narrative wriggling room for that.
    So, FAGE basically provides your basic D&D combat experience, with stunts added and much less extra-rules weighing it down. Which is actually a pretty thing, but probably not quite what I was looking for (however, I could get used to it if the other parts of the system are good enough).

    A lot of this might sound rather negative: The thing being probably that I like how FAGE plays, but I'm definitely not coming from a D&D angle at it (always disliked that system), so I'm not that ready to put up with the (to me) less functional parts of the rules that are clearly inherited from D&D. FAGE does a good thing, but in my book, it could have gone much further in that.

  • #2
    Re: What does FAGE do really well?

    Originally posted by Jakob Schmidt View Post
    FAGE does a good thing, but in my book, it could have gone much further in that.
    In a way this is what Greenronin intented. They have mentioned before that the current FAGE core rulebook, is just that, the core. It's meant to be the fundament upon which they (and you) can build. Their upcoming books should help out with that.
    That in my opinion is perhaps FAGE's most unique selling point: Everything is so basic and streamlined (talents, specializations and arcana pretty much all use the same format) that you can easily homebrew your own things or make adjustments to the core content.

    I agree with you that there are several things which could've been more fleshed out or have some 'gaps', such as the accessibility of weapon groups to classes other than a warrior (or more freedom at level 1). Some other things that come to mind are things like having both accuracy and fighting, there is no need to have both if weapon groups are restricted anyway; brawling being an accuracy focus and not a fighting one (why not both or whichever is higher); At early levels in longer periods where you only take 5-minute breathers mages seem to just run out of MP too quickly with no way to regain it other than meditating (which takes an hour) etc..
    At the moment I think the best way to deal with these things is to homerule it. I do hope that the upcoming books will give some more options and freedom in that regard. Or at least show us how they (Greenronin) would 'solve' some of these issues or perhaps how they use the restrictions for new content.

    As for the HP issue. This has been discussed before, I guess it also depends a bit on how your group plays, I don't think Greenronin will change that. I heard that a lot of groups basically lowered the amount of HP gained at each level which should already help a lot.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: What does FAGE do really well?

      Unmodified and right out of the box, FAGE is essentially a d6 System, not very much different from the d20 System. Whatever issues you have with the core of the d20 System, they will most likely be here still.

      What does FAGE do well for me? You've already mentioned it: The Stunt mechanic. That is it. Everything else is D&D that is restricted to d6's.

      How will your "next big campaign" fare in FAGE? Like most d6/d20 Systems, FAGE is heavy on the combat side, implying that it would fit best with games that have a significant amount of combat. If your "next big campaign" would lean towards intrigue and social encounters, you might want to look to other systems to make your campaign all the more enchanting.

      All of this, of course, assumes that you're running FAGE unmodified. For example, I love D&D and its strict rules, but I hate the variety of dice it uses (d4 to d20). So, my Dungeons & Dragons AGE gives me the best of both worlds: d6's, Stunts, and D&D. ^_^

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: What does FAGE do really well?

        I'm doing my first ever campaign because ow watching the Titansgrave webseries. And so far what I really like is the fact that things are really easy to pick up and learn for the PCs and for me as a GM. We've got one person who's got any familiarity with other systems or roleplaying in general so for the rest of us it's really nice having a simple set of rules to work with.

        I agree that things are really rigid as the basic core book. However I'm also a fan of saying "f-it" and giving people thing as is needed or it makes sense narrative. I also think that the fans and homebrewers are a really excellent resource for me. The fact that Green Ronin is a small publishing company means we're not going to wait when we need something, instead it gets posted, and played with on the boards.

        I do think HP being too high is becoming an issue where the battles drag out for a really long time, but there's not a real fear of PCs dying as even our mage can sit and be a meat wall at this point.

        But overall I really like the openness of the system and adaptable it is.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: What does FAGE do really well?

          What i love about the system is its overall simplicity. the fact that it can be so easily modified to fit the needs of your game is just a very cool factor. The rules are so simple that you can easily add or remove things that don't fit. I don't like games that are really rules-heavy, with a rule for every scenario. I like to have freedom when creating certain things and FAGE does just that. There have been so many Fan-Made things on this forum alone, that it creates an entire new book or more of information to add to your games. in fact, i have done just that and my players and i love the fan-made content and i have even made my own.

          I have always been an advocate of D&D 3.5 (Not so much for Pathfinder), and recently 5th edition. As well as numerous other games that are simple and easy to play. But while my brother is into Savage Worlds, i prefer FAGE. Yes, there is a lot to be had with this system and yes, there is so very much to learn; but that is the beauty of the system. i give a hardy thumbs up to GR for FAGE.

          Now, if things in the system are not to your liking, then that is okay; to each his own, Right? But the only thing i really want to say is, find what makes you happy and jump in. to be a part of a game is fun and exciting for both the player and the GM. so, have fun and remember to do what you love.

          Peace
          [URL="https://drive.google.com/open?id=0ByE2hNokDtpAR0pWWHBadjJQdkU"]Age of Alchemy[/URL]
          [URL="https://drive.google.com/open?id=0ByE2hNokDtpAY1JteV9mQjhxamc"]Battlemap Rules based on HeroScape[/URL]
          [URL="https://drive.google.com/open?id=0ByE2hNokDtpAVzNDRUtWT0pjSnM"]Kingdom Hearts/Final Fantasy - Playtest version[/URL]
          [URL="https://drive.google.com/open?id=0ByE2hNokDtpATDZrZUhXaHBJd00"]Magic Items Repository Volume 1[/URL]
          [URL="https://drive.google.com/open?id=0ByE2hNokDtpAcHVOdVUtajJnV1k"]Magic Items Repository Volume 2[/URL]
          [URL="https://drive.google.com/open?id=0ByE2hNokDtpAcWM5VWFhcXVZUEU"]FAGE-TitansGrave Random Character Generator[/URL]
          [URL="https://drive.google.com/open?id=0ByE2hNokDtpANUxzNHo2aDYxejA"]20 races for FAGE...enjoy[/URL]
          [URL="https://vladgenx.wordpress.com/"]https://vladgenx.wordpress.com/[/URL] This is my new log Site i just created. it is going to have fantasy short story snippets for you guys. Enjoy

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: What does FAGE do really well?

            Yeah, stunts were also the big point for us. We used to play Savage Worlds as our go-to generic system, the focus was too much on action-packed games but it was the best we had. AGE is even simpler and the stunt system is great for our more narrative and simplified combats.

            However what I -REALLY- liked is the fact that while many systems have a chapter for n00bs where you can teach rpg to someone, AGE was in fact the first non-FATE system that we played that was actually really easy for begginers. I GMed a dragon age game session for three groups of eight 10-14yo kids and they got attributes, focuses and specially stunts in no time.

            However I don't think the spell system are that great. The arcanas are... meh... Quite easy to teach to outsiders, sure, but nothing glorious as the stunt system. And I don't like game system classes that limit you. Setting classes with limitations are ok (all wizards from dragonlance are from one of the three towers / all mages from thedas are beacons for demons / no one care for no-spellcasters in faerun / white mages from FF don't use bladed weapons, etc). Like you I just frankly don't like fixed proficiencies and skill lists in generic systems. However it brings another great point:

            Customization. AGE rules are pretty simple. The bonuses are small. You can easily tweak to taste with very minor changes. Don't like the amount o hp? Make it +CON / level instead of dice+con; decrease a little opponent hp or don't and there you are. Want a new magic system? Easy to create new arcanas or whole new systems. Classless? Tons of people made their own.

            Now, finally, there's something I -really- like, and that is stunt-die-based success threshold. In D&D there are many times that while a roll of DC is a success, DC+X is a better success that does something else. Some skills, monster abilities, knowledge checks all have some increasing degrees of success. Storyteller has the infamous Successes; from 1 to 5+ tha represent how well you did something. Savage Worlds has...what's it called... Raises; if you got 4 you pass but you get 8 you achieve something extra, maybe another extra at 12, 16 and so on.

            While in these system you usually keep counting after your success to make sure you can reap the benefits of a higher threshold, in AGE if you pass the TN you just tell the GM how much you rolled on the stunt/dragon die and that's it. It may not sound much, but I found that after players get used to that, they just stop counting when I said they achieved success and just tell me their stunt die result and/or if they stunted. Sometimes I just look at their dice and if the total showing is enough then we don't even care to add the positive modifiers.

            As my games have a LOT of exploration, social conflict and knowledge tests being able to easily tell what was thew degree of success of something speeds up things immensely. Even if you don't remember what the degrees are you can just think about 1 to 5 stars. 1 meh, partial, 3 acceptable; 5-6 above expectations. Add advanced tests and I can create whole interesting adventures based on noncombat skills and abilities.

            Hell, this system is so solid and the rules so simple that I basically never play vanilla FAGE, but only World of Darkness games using the AGE engine!


            Now for the cons:

            -I don't like HP bloat (fixable). No need to explain.

            -I don't like the fact that like many rpgs there's a lot of combat rules and just a little of rules for everything else. While the game has some solid rules for non-combat options (just look at that introductory adventure in the DAGE core; tracking down smugglers, negotiating, going to a noble party, crashing a drug deal and being able to solve all that with diplomacy? Pure gold!), most non-combat extra rules are lacking. Noncombat talents, while seriously useful for exploration or social -heavy games (like mine, where we got into the sixth fight well into the 26th game session, or the other proposed settin, Blue Rose), get less and less useful as campaigns become more mixed. Of course they are next-to useless on combat-heavy games, but they do so little that in mixed games you can safely ignore most of them to focus on survavibility. Also noncombat stunts need a -serious- rework to be more useful and to fit more situations.

            I suppose that Blue Rose will bring more useful non-combat goodness, so for now I wait.

            -And I don't like "combat attributes"; I hate accuracy and fighting; in this regard I prefer how things are in DAGE. But then I hate the Magic stat there (except when in thedas). And if you do use them why the weapon group restriction anyway?
            Last edited by DiBastet; 12th April 2016, 02:50 PM.
            DiBastet's Homebrew - My own homebrew. Use them, mine them for ideas, change them, as you see fit.
            AGE of Darkness - Converting World of Darkness to Fantasy Age.
            AGE of Wacraft - Playing AGE in Azeroth.

            Age of Homebrew - Links to other homebrew. Feel free to add more.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: What does FAGE do really well?

              Speaking of Blue Rose, i heard that it was going to be less combat heavy, so we are going to get more social-based rules and that is a plus for me. i can't wait for that supplement to come out. going to expand my already extensive library.
              [URL="https://drive.google.com/open?id=0ByE2hNokDtpAR0pWWHBadjJQdkU"]Age of Alchemy[/URL]
              [URL="https://drive.google.com/open?id=0ByE2hNokDtpAY1JteV9mQjhxamc"]Battlemap Rules based on HeroScape[/URL]
              [URL="https://drive.google.com/open?id=0ByE2hNokDtpAVzNDRUtWT0pjSnM"]Kingdom Hearts/Final Fantasy - Playtest version[/URL]
              [URL="https://drive.google.com/open?id=0ByE2hNokDtpATDZrZUhXaHBJd00"]Magic Items Repository Volume 1[/URL]
              [URL="https://drive.google.com/open?id=0ByE2hNokDtpAcHVOdVUtajJnV1k"]Magic Items Repository Volume 2[/URL]
              [URL="https://drive.google.com/open?id=0ByE2hNokDtpAcWM5VWFhcXVZUEU"]FAGE-TitansGrave Random Character Generator[/URL]
              [URL="https://drive.google.com/open?id=0ByE2hNokDtpANUxzNHo2aDYxejA"]20 races for FAGE...enjoy[/URL]
              [URL="https://vladgenx.wordpress.com/"]https://vladgenx.wordpress.com/[/URL] This is my new log Site i just created. it is going to have fantasy short story snippets for you guys. Enjoy

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: What does FAGE do really well?

                Originally posted by DiBastet View Post
                Yeah, [B]
                Now, finally, there's something I -really- like, and that is stunt-die-based success threshold. In D&D there are many times that while a roll of DC is a success, DC+X is a better success that does something else. Some skills, monster abilities, knowledge checks all have some increasing degrees of success. Storyteller has the infamous Successes; from 1 to 5+ tha represent how well you did something. Savage Worlds has...what's it called... Raises; if you got 4 you pass but you get 8 you achieve something extra, maybe another extra at 12, 16 and so on.

                While in these system you usually keep counting after your success to make sure you can reap the benefits of a higher threshold, in AGE if you pass the TN you just tell the GM how much you rolled on the stunt/dragon die and that's it. It may not sound much, but I found that after players get used to that, they just stop counting when I said they achieved success and just tell me their stunt die result and/or if they stunted. Sometimes I just look at their dice and if the total showing is enough then we don't even care to add the positive modifiers.
                Yes, that is a great feature - similar to The One Ring, where you find out the degree of sucess by seeing if you have rolled one or two 6s in your pool. I definitely like that.

                I'm not that sure about customizing the system, though ... the thing being that I'm not so great at analyzing rules, and it is not really transparent how the classes are designed, and therefore where tweaking them could seriously break game balance or impact other mechanisms. Hoever, you're certainly right that tweaking HP is pretty simple.

                Basically, FantasyAge feels like a good system with the brakes on to me. And that's not even a matter of missing rules content (while I admit that a little more rules guidance for non-combat siutations would be very welcome; however, I'm pretty sure we'll get that from Blue Rose, which I will get anyway, whether I'll be using the FantasyAge rules or not for it); it's more that there is too much of some things. Too many class restrictions, stuff like weapon groups (do you need them at all? couldn't this somehow be handled with the other rules already present - strength minimum, maybe restricting weapon's foci?), things like the automatic "magic missile" for the mage (there are a lot of mage concepts where throwing around small bolts of destructive energy in combat simply doesn't fit; however, if we take that ability away from a mage, what would we give him instead?). This is all obviously aimed at balancing the classes out in combat, so if I change anything about it, I really don't know what I am doing to game balance in that regard.

                Still, the more I'm writing about it, the more I notice how much I wan't to make this game work for me ... maybe tweaking HP is a good start.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: What does FAGE do really well?

                  Originally posted by Jakob Schmidt View Post
                  Still, the more I'm writing about it, the more I notice how much I wan't to make this game work for me ... maybe tweaking HP is a good start.
                  Yep, most of FAGE is actually fun, and really simple, esp. if you come from D&D3.5 and Pathfinder. Right out of the box, it's really great for beginners. And for the more experienced, it's really simple to brew.

                  Your interest in the HP rules tells me that you're gearing up for combat in your campaign. If this is the case, then FAGE should be a nice fit for you. If you're tweaking Health, just be sure that you're ready to handle how the unmodified damage mechanics will treat your new Health mechanic. ^_^

                  And don't be afraid to tweak the rules. Unless you're looking to publish your homebrew, you shouldn't be worried too much about game balance.

                  If you're upfront with your players that you're tweaking the game system for your homebrew, I'm sure they'd be open to you changing stuff here and there every now and then, which you probably would as you encounter game aspects that have been adversely affected by your earlier tweaks. Your players might even play a more active part, and propose this change and that, which would make them more invested in your game.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: What does FAGE do really well?

                    Originally posted by Jakob Schmidt View Post
                    if I change anything about it, I really don't know what I am doing to game balance in that regard.
                    Risking being repetitive, as I always say "balance is arbitrary. The only "balance" you should care about is that there is no trap and no default options; that all player options are useful for your gamr and that they can shine".

                    That said, if you don't like the mage's bolt of magic (ported directly from DAGE's thedas setting, where it makes sense), take a look at these rules.

                    My point is: Since it's a pretty easy system, if you don't yet know how to brew what you want, there's a good chance that someone already brewed something at least similar that may serve as a base or inspiration. You may found some homebrew on my sig.


                    PS: And I think that some members should take a hint from the GITP forum and create a "my homebrew" topic for them to post their own homebrew. At the very least someone searching the forum might findd the rules useful.
                    DiBastet's Homebrew - My own homebrew. Use them, mine them for ideas, change them, as you see fit.
                    AGE of Darkness - Converting World of Darkness to Fantasy Age.
                    AGE of Wacraft - Playing AGE in Azeroth.

                    Age of Homebrew - Links to other homebrew. Feel free to add more.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: What does FAGE do really well?

                      Originally posted by DiBastet View Post

                      -And I don't like "combat attributes"; I hate accuracy and fighting; in this regard I prefer how things are in DAGE. But then I hate the Magic stat there (except when in thedas). And if you do use them why the weapon group restriction anyway?
                      For another point of view: to have combat attributes has the, perhaps ironical, consequence that you can have valid non-fighter characters with high values in Dexterity and/or Strength without them being automatically decent fighters (even with the modifier for unlearned weapons). Hodor in Game of Thrones would be such a character: Strength 5, Fighting -1 - and no Strength -2 rolls (leaving 3d6 + 3) for unlearned heavy weapons.

                      Also, I am not a big fan of extensive rules for non-combat situations. The extremely well done generic hazard rules are all I need (and want) for exploration, and for intrigues there are nearly enough Abilities/Focusses and Talents (Command, Contact, Carousing) to improvise the hell out of any situation.

                      A Negotiator talent or a Steward talent (for GoT like games) would be nice, though. Anybody done that?

                      Just my 2 cents.
                      Last edited by rulandor; 14th April 2016, 06:41 AM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: What does FAGE do really well?

                        Originally posted by TheGreyWulf View Post

                        Your interest in the HP rules tells me that you're gearing up for combat in your campaign. If this is the case, then FAGE should be a nice fit for you. If you're tweaking Health, just be sure that you're ready to handle how the unmodified damage mechanics will treat your new Health mechanic. ^_^

                        Actually not ... I like combat encounters, but only for the sense of danger and urgency, and only about one per session - and for that, it is important that characters are to a certain degree vulnerable from the first round on (that goes for me as GM as well as player, btw.). I don't like having to grind the PC's down first ... On the other hand, it shouldn't feel totally arbitrary who gets seriously wounded, who dies; abilities and tactics should play a major role in this.
                        Furthermore, I like my combat short. Everything beyond 30 minutes is really out of the question for me.
                        There are actually very few systems I know of that do that well - RuneQuest6 is one of them (you can really be out of combat with one hit, even if your opponent ist only wielding a short sword, but still, it's not all luck; quite the contrary). However, it is also very rules-heavy, and I'm not really into that. On the whole, FantasyAge just promises a lot more fun and accessibility in actual play.

                        So modifying health for me would be in pursuit of hitting that sweet spot where the combat rules on the one hand make for good, short, intense fights, while on the other hand encourage the PC's to look for other options than fighting, because getting into a fight is actually dangerous.

                        For me, good combat rules pretty much boil down to: They encourage you to actually not use them that often; but IF you use them, it gets really intense.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: What does FAGE do really well?

                          Originally posted by Jakob Schmidt View Post
                          They encourage you to actually not use them that often; but IF you use them, it gets really intense.
                          Quite what I look for when I use my fixed health rule. I enjoy the fixed 3 wound levels of Savage Worlds, where a lucky blow can fell someone, 7 of Storytelling, and even the fixed health of the deadly Witcher a Game of Imagination. The threat of violence becomes a real threat when you realize that a 50/50 chance of winning (surviving) or losing (death) is not acceptable for people to throw themselves at risk. Hence tipping the scales before even fighting, if you ever decide to; not only that but when the other side sees the odds they might as well retreat.

                          That's why I use fixed health: Everyone and their mothers have 10 + 5 x CON health. Large monsters have +10, huge +20 (to represent body mass). It works Jakob.
                          DiBastet's Homebrew - My own homebrew. Use them, mine them for ideas, change them, as you see fit.
                          AGE of Darkness - Converting World of Darkness to Fantasy Age.
                          AGE of Wacraft - Playing AGE in Azeroth.

                          Age of Homebrew - Links to other homebrew. Feel free to add more.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: What does FAGE do really well?

                            Originally posted by DiBastet View Post

                            That's why I use fixed health: Everyone and their mothers have 10 + 5 x CON health. Large monsters have +10, huge +20 (to represent body mass). It works Jakob.

                            That actually sounds like a really good idea - I will give it a try, maybe not quite as radically (maybe using 15, 20 and 25 as base values for Mages, Rogues and Warriors), and maybe keeping in some level progression (instead of getting CON x 5 from the beginning, it might be CON X 1 at first level and then +CON every four levels or something like that).

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                            • #15
                              Re: What does FAGE do really well?

                              Intense, dangerous combat is why I upped damage. 1- or 2-d6 just doesn't really stand a chance of getting through AR, but even 1d10 stands a solid chance of punching through AR with modifiers.

                              To go back to the original question, F-AGE has some very solid points to it. It is easily moddable, and a highly streamlined system. It is easy to teach to newcomers, and is in general a fun system to play. It works very well for plug and play, highly cinematic tables.

                              That said, there are some weaknesses - IMO, it actually requires modding if you are going to play an actual full campaign. While it's great for beginners, I find the simplicity a little stifling for experienced players looking for a longer experience. Take for example the Arcana system: it's great for rolling up a mage on the fly, or for a GM, but it's a little too simple IMO for an experienced player to take from 1-20. Organizationally, it's superior than the spell trees in D-AGE, but D-AGE should have included flow charts.

                              Likewise, if your group is wanting cinematic experiences, it's hard to top F-AGE. The stunt system is fun and dynamic, and I love that it's just not a "double damage on crits". However, I wish they'd expand he RPing and exploration stunts. I use a lot of those encounters, and they're woefully underrepresented. Additionally, I wish there were a better system for fumbles (or any). But, in contrast, AGE is not a sim, and it won't be one. Old editions of D&D had dozens of armor and weapon types which were different from each other in damage, AC, speed, etc.; Shadowrun has dozens of statistically different (yet similar) vehicles that can be further modded to give individuality. AGE is not those games.

                              Tl;dr - AGE has some great qualities to it if the style of play that it was designed for matches your table.

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