Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Notice: a new mechanic from D&D 5e

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Notice: a new mechanic from D&D 5e

    Okay, so i really like both Fantasy Age and D&D 5th for their simplicity yet diversity. In D&D 5 there is a mechanic called Passive Perception that takes 10+your Wisdom Modifier. the GM rolls against this to see if you notice anything that is blatantly obvious. if the GM rolls under you see it if they roll over you don't. simple right?

    Well, i thought about adding it into Fantasy Age. it will be 10+Perception as a passive number. now any focuses might apply to the number if they would come into play. to see something it is 10+Perception (seeing) or to hear a rustle it is 10+Perception (Hearing). if the GM fails this (essentially) Target Number, then you see or hear whatever is there. this is not a player based roll, to indicate that the player noticed something without actively looking for it. it is more of a "Hey, look what i found!" more than a "Let me see if i can find..." kind of a roll.

    Any thoughts?
    [URL="https://drive.google.com/open?id=0ByE2hNokDtpAR0pWWHBadjJQdkU"]Age of Alchemy[/URL]
    [URL="https://drive.google.com/open?id=0ByE2hNokDtpAY1JteV9mQjhxamc"]Battlemap Rules based on HeroScape[/URL]
    [URL="https://drive.google.com/open?id=0ByE2hNokDtpAVzNDRUtWT0pjSnM"]Kingdom Hearts/Final Fantasy - Playtest version[/URL]
    [URL="https://drive.google.com/open?id=0ByE2hNokDtpATDZrZUhXaHBJd00"]Magic Items Repository Volume 1[/URL]
    [URL="https://drive.google.com/open?id=0ByE2hNokDtpAcHVOdVUtajJnV1k"]Magic Items Repository Volume 2[/URL]
    [URL="https://drive.google.com/open?id=0ByE2hNokDtpAcWM5VWFhcXVZUEU"]FAGE-TitansGrave Random Character Generator[/URL]
    [URL="https://drive.google.com/open?id=0ByE2hNokDtpANUxzNHo2aDYxejA"]20 races for FAGE...enjoy[/URL]
    [URL="https://vladgenx.wordpress.com/"]https://vladgenx.wordpress.com/[/URL] This is my new log Site i just created. it is going to have fantasy short story snippets for you guys. Enjoy

  • #2
    Re: Notice: a new mechanic from D&D 5e

    This is how exactly it goes at my table.

    That said, we are a gaming group that transitioned to AGE from D&D 5E, so there might be some bias right there.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Notice: a new mechanic from D&D 5e

      That's basically what I do, but I have the players roll and its a TN to beat (not fail). I get results and tell them what they observe. That way I dont have to keep track of PER scores. Its frequently fluff, too, so that keeps them on guard.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Notice: a new mechanic from D&D 5e

        Originally posted by shonuff View Post
        That's basically what I do, but I have the players roll and its a TN to beat (not fail). I get results and tell them what they observe. That way I dont have to keep track of PER scores. Its frequently fluff, too, so that keeps them on guard.
        But, if the players have to roll, it defeats the purpose of a "passive check".

        Unless you're saying that they roll at the beginning of the session, and you take that result as their Passive Perception for the rest of the session. Then that's fine.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Notice: a new mechanic from D&D 5e

          I like the difference between "Hey, look what i found!" and "Let me see if i can find...".
          The passive perception as described, to me, would seem like something fun (especially) for PCs who have a high perception or excel in a specific type of perception but not so much for the really obvious things, more for little nuances and details the other PCs (with lower passive perception) will not notice.

          Could you elaborate on what you mean with 'blatantly obvious'?
          Or at least the way our group plays - anything that would be blatantly obvious is simply explained by the GM since one can see, feel, smell or hear it - i.e. something that "anyone" would notice.

          At least I expect you don't want to know someone's passive perception to see if they notice something like "You notice the door has a red colour!" which anyone would see unless they're (colour)blind, but instead something more along the lines of "You notice some drops of paint at the bottom of the red door, it must have been painted very recently." which is a slight detail but adds new information which might be important and might have been found if one would have examined the door actively.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Notice: a new mechanic from D&D 5e

            Originally posted by Gerben View Post
            I like the difference between "Hey, look what i found!" and "Let me see if i can find...".
            The passive perception as described, to me, would seem like something fun (especially) for PCs who have a high perception or excel in a specific type of perception but not so much for the really obvious things, more for little nuances and details the other PCs (with lower passive perception) will not notice.

            Could you elaborate on what you mean with 'blatantly obvious'?
            Or at least the way our group plays - anything that would be blatantly obvious is simply explained by the GM since one can see, feel, smell or hear it - i.e. something that "anyone" would notice.

            At least I expect you don't want to know someone's passive perception to see if they notice something like "You notice the door has a red colour!" which anyone would see unless they're (colour)blind, but instead something more along the lines of "You notice some drops of paint at the bottom of the red door, it must have been painted very recently." which is a slight detail but adds new information which might be important and might have been found if one would have examined the door actively.
            In my games, I typically put a static TN on something important that is not "blatantly obvious", but would be interesting for the PCs to perceive.

            An example would be a secret door that has been built into the wall of a corridor. I'd already have a TN set for sensing that door (say, Perception TN 12), but if nobody actively looks for it, they get an unannounced second chance if I deem that they've walked near enough the door to sense it without actively looking for it (say, 2-4 yards of the door). I then just compare the TN with their Passive Perception scores. If anyone succeeds, I let them know. If nobody succeeds, nobody is the wiser and I just wasted time building that door and that dragon-slaying sword behind it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Notice: a new mechanic from D&D 5e

              Originally posted by TheGreyWulf View Post
              In my games, I typically put a static TN on something important that is not "blatantly obvious", but would be interesting for the PCs to perceive.

              An example would be a secret door that has been built into the wall of a corridor. I'd already have a TN set for sensing that door (say, Perception TN 12), but if nobody actively looks for it, they get an unannounced second chance if I deem that they've walked near enough the door to sense it without actively looking for it (say, 2-4 yards of the door). I then just compare the TN with their Passive Perception scores. If anyone succeeds, I let them know. If nobody succeeds, nobody is the wiser and I just wasted time building that door and that dragon-slaying sword behind it.
              Yeah that makes sense, the "blatantly obvious" part confused me.

              The secret door is a good example, especially since they don't have to roll for it, if you ask them to roll a perception test and they don't see anything (didn't reach the TN) it's like "oh something might be there, let's stick around and investigate" - it becomes a bit awkward.

              I'll pass this on to my GM, he'll enjoy using this for sure.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Notice: a new mechanic from D&D 5e

                Originally posted by Gerben View Post
                Yeah that makes sense, the "blatantly obvious" part confused me.

                The secret door is a good example, especially since they don't have to roll for it, if you ask them to roll a perception test and they don't see anything (didn't reach the TN) it's like "oh something might be there, let's stick around and investigate" - it becomes a bit awkward.

                I'll pass this on to my GM, he'll enjoy using this for sure.
                Take note that my example was relatively benign. This can apply to traps, hazards, and hidden enemies as well. Harharhar!

                But you are correct that it takes away that awkwardness and metagaming aspects of explicitly calling out for tests. If the players fail a called Perception test against hidden ambushers, they begin metagaming and do all sorts of defensive stuff that they normally wouldn't do. I should know - it's like second nature to me.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Notice: a new mechanic from D&D 5e

                  It works. You'll use it an never turn back.

                  We always used passive, since the end of 3.0 thru 3.5 and PF and SW... so I get confused when I remember it's not part of most rpgs...
                  DiBastet's Homebrew - My own homebrew. Use them, mine them for ideas, change them, as you see fit.
                  AGE of Darkness - Converting World of Darkness to Fantasy Age.
                  AGE of Wacraft - Playing AGE in Azeroth.

                  Age of Homebrew - Links to other homebrew. Feel free to add more.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Notice: a new mechanic from D&D 5e

                    I would suggest a passive perception be calculated as follows:

                    Passive Perception = 6 + Perception + Perception Focus

                    A base of seven means that a passive success is the same as rolling a "routine" ability test according to the "Basic Test Difficulty" table on page 3. Rolling seven or higher has roughly a 90% success chance on 3d6. Rolling six or higher has roughly 95% chance of success. By assuming six as a passive base only 1 roll in 20 would end up as a true failure that was missed.

                    This could be easily ported to all the other ability tests. Think about strength and opening closed doors. Your beefy warrior with 5 Strength automatically passes all average TN 11 strength based tests.

                    You could even go as far as applying this to combat attack rolls (accuracy/fighting or intelligence) for a cost of not generating stunt points. For example with 3 accuracy plus single focus for a total of +5 to hit:
                    • Being attacked by one horse sized duck-beast with defense of 13? Roll attack like normal and generate stunt points.
                    • Being attacked by ten duck sized horse-beasts with a defense of 10? 11 passive hit means you can forget stunt points and start slicing in.
                    [URL="http://herdingdice.tumblr.com/"]Herding Dice[/URL] - A tumblr where I put things about Adventure Game Engine design.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Notice: a new mechanic from D&D 5e

                      Originally posted by TheGreyWulf View Post
                      But, if the players have to roll, it defeats the purpose of a "passive check".

                      Unless you're saying that they roll at the beginning of the session, and you take that result as their Passive Perception for the rest of the session. Then that's fine.
                      No, they roll themselves, just at varying intervals. Just a successful result might indicate that they freshly baked bread, or a street performer, or something else. That just keeps me from having to keep their scores on hand for a check. It works for us.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Notice: a new mechanic from D&D 5e

                        Originally posted by shonuff View Post
                        No, they roll themselves, just at varying intervals. Just a successful result might indicate that they freshly baked bread, or a street performer, or something else. That just keeps me from having to keep their scores on hand for a check. It works for us.
                        Alright, I think I get it. Then, I do think yours is not a Passive Perception mechanic - more like the usual Perception test. The point of having Passive Perception is to have the GM avoid calling for a Perception test, and consequently (at least in my experience) avoid having to deal with players using metagaming techniques to respond to a failed roll.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Notice: a new mechanic from D&D 5e

                          Originally posted by mdlthree View Post
                          I would suggest a passive perception be calculated as follows:

                          Passive Perception = 6 + Perception + Perception Focus
                          Actually, the only consideration made in D&D5E was the die roll. So when I ported it over, I made the same consideration.

                          A natural 1d20 roll has a range of 1 to 20, with a median of 10.5. Rounding down, that's 10. So, 10 + Perception.

                          A natural 3d6 roll has a range of 3 to 18, with a median of 10.5. Rounding down, that's 10. So, 10 + Perception + Focus.
                          If there is an argument to take the median of each die, then the 1d6 has a median of 3 (rounded down). So that's 9 + Perception + Focus.
                          Last edited by TheGreyWulf; 11th January 2016, 08:09 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Notice: a new mechanic from D&D 5e

                            Originally posted by TheGreyWulf View Post
                            Alright, I think I get it. Then, I do think yours is not a Passive Perception mechanic - more like the usual Perception test. The point of having Passive Perception is to have the GM avoid calling for a Perception test, and consequently (at least in my experience) avoid having to deal with players using metagaming techniques to respond to a failed roll.
                            I'do say it's still passive, because I'm calling for the roll - they're just doing the physical rolling. And that meta-gaming still happens when the GM is rolling. Don't think that because you do it behind a screen that they can't hear the roll.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Notice: a new mechanic from D&D 5e

                              Originally posted by TheGreyWulf View Post
                              Actually, the only consideration made in D&D5E was the die roll. So when I ported it over, I made the same consideration.

                              A natural 1d20 roll has a range of 1 to 20, with a median of 10.5. Rounding down, that's 10. So, 10 + Perception.

                              A natural 3d6 roll has a range of 3 to 18, with a median of 10.5. Rounding down, that's 10. So, 10 + Perception + Focus.
                              If there is an argument to take the median of each die, then the 1d6 has a median of 3 (rounded down). So that's 9 + Perception + Focus.
                              Personally, I'd stick with 10. The default derived stat is 10+STAT+Focus.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X