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Freedom 'verse's Hades

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  • #16
    Re: Freedom 'verse's Hades

    There should be a notation that plenty of priests as well as magicians attempt to become the gods they represent in Voodoo and their religion allows voluntary possession. Baron Samedi is infamous as well as someone who evil man have tried to use in such a respect.

    No offense to the deity himself.

    In my game, I simply make Baron Samedi a thief of the Baron's power and an embarrassment to the deity. Of course, as mentioned, Baron Kriminel is also a part of the dark side of the deity.

    So you could easily just have Baron Samedi be the "nickname" of the supervillain and not strictly accurate.
    Last edited by Charles Phipps; 08-30-2016, 08:08 AM.
    [b]The United Federation of Charles[/b]: [url]http://unitedfederationofcharles.blogspot.com/[/url]
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    • #17
      Re: Freedom 'verse's Hades

      Originally posted by Charles Phipps View Post
      So you could easily just have Baron Samedi be the "nickname" of the supervillain and not strictly accurate.
      Bonus points if you establish the supervillain chose the name for the same ignorant reasons most people would.

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      • #18
        Re: Freedom 'verse's Hades

        Originally posted by SilvercatMoonpaw View Post
        Bonus points if you establish the supervillain chose the name for the same ignorant reasons most people would.
        ^_^ "Huge Bond fan. Loved the character."
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        • #19
          Re: Freedom 'verse's Hades

          I imagine the Western trope of casting Hades as "the evil one" results from the simplistic equation with a "Lord of the Underworld" with the figure of The Devil/Satan, even though that's a superficial concept which doesn't take any of the context from Greek mythology into account. Ares is much more easily translatable as a villain, since Athena represents the concepts of a "just-war", while Ares embodies bloodshed, carnage, and loss. A replacement figure for Hades might be the Titan Tartarus, or one of the other Cthonic (gods of the underworld) figures in Greek myth. Or just give him a specific grudge/rivalry with Daedalus, as suggested by some. Taurus and Talos can still easily work with modified backgrounds, as also previously noted.

          Which is rather like Marvel's use of Loki as (prior to the Modern Age) an outright villain; throughout almost all of Norse mythology, he's a helpful, clever figure-a trickster who uses his wiles and magic to aid the other Norse god. His role in bringing about Ragnarok was apparently a late-addition to his story, and one which may have been influenced by early Christian influences on the Viking populations, as his role becomes that of a rebellious angel, ushering in doomsday and then the rebirth of the world.

          Baron Samedi...yes, having just read about "Baron Krimenel", I agree the latter is a good replacement. American/European writers/creators in all media have the unfortunate tendency to treat non-Western religions as if their deities are demons, monsters, or oddball myth figures, even when said religions have large, active populations of worshipers. Perhaps not as much a problem in decades past, but borderline offensive to many in an age where we live in a far more connected, diverse era.

          All my best.

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          • #20
            Re: Freedom 'verse's Hades

            My personal take on Freedom City's Hades is that, somewhat ironically, he will never believe that he's playing EXACTLY the sort of Petty Games with Mortals his Relations take such delight in, but is instead pursuing his Legitimate Business as King of Hades by seeking to bring Daedalus into the Underworld Forever (in much the same style one might expect of a 'Legitimate Businessman' who invokes inverted apostrophes); he genuinely regards the Cunning Craftsman as a "T" that needs crossed before Hades can finally settle down to some serious Rustication in the Underworld (going unsaid in all this is a burning desire to have occasional dealing with individuals who are NOT the mourning shades of the miserable dead or his insufferable relations, which manifests most strongly during that half of the year when Persephone is not in residence with her Husband).

            Really, I tend to see Hades as "the quiet one" of the Olympian Pantheon in much the same way that a dormant volcano is the "quiet one" geologically speaking; all may be quiet on the surface, but mighty forces are still working their way towards an eventual explosion (which tends to result in spectacular consequences like the Abduction of Persephone and the Little Ice Age/Famine that ensued).

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