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Golden Age Sidekicks of the Freedom-verse!

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  • Golden Age Sidekicks of the Freedom-verse!

    You know, one thing that the past of Freedom City doesn't have a lot of, I've noticed, is sidekicks and other assorted young heroes for the Golden and Silver Ages. Aside from the various Arrows, I can't think of any off of the top of my head. So, let's fix that! Pitch the name of a character, brief description, and which hero they're sidekicking for (if any) and let's see where it goes! I'll start.

    Half Past

    An orphan shilling newspapers in Freedom City, this plucky youngster came to the aid of Midnight. Now, Half Past is an invaluable asset to the mystery man's crimefighting endeavors.

  • #2
    Re: Golden Age Sidekicks of the Freedom-verse!

    Egret
    Strange reports of a flying girl in Newfoundland caused Mike O'Connor, the Freedom Eagle, to take a rare trip (before the outbreak of the War, at least) up North to investigate. He was concerned that somebody had managed to copy/replicate his design for his flight-pack. What he found instead was a confused teenage girl, who went by the name Ygritte, and had actual, biological wings. Unable to remember her origins clearly, she had clearly fallen at some point and hurt her head. Mike O'Connor took her under his wing, and a misunderstanding of her name by the press led to her going by the moniker "Egret." While slower than the Freedom Eagle's artificial wings, Egret was much more maneuverable, and an instinctive natural to flight. Gradually, her head wound healed, and her memory returned. She realized she was an Avian, blown from the Aerie during a tremendous storm, and returned to them after the end of the Second World War. She never left, but Mike O'Connor, and later his son, were the rare outsiders welcome in the city of the flying people, and Ygritte's family are still fond of them.

    (This is fun, because I love the Golden Age. I'll try to do more.)

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    • #3
      Re: Golden Age Sidekicks of the Freedom-verse!

      Hot Rod
      Rodney Ross was one of Johnny Wade's fellow mechanics at the garage they worked at, and a bit of a mentor to the teenager, both professionally and in his personal life. Rodney was one of the few people Johnny told his true identity too when he started his career as the super-fast Johnny Rocket. Worried about his young friend, and also inspired by his example to take a more pro-active role in protecting his city, Rodney built a tricked out automobile, the "Road-Star," and accompanied Johnny Rocket into the field as Hot Rod! While the Road-Star could hardly keep pace with Johnny's speed, it had room to carry passengers (whether rescued victims or crooks on their way to the slammer), and contained all kinds of useful equipment that Johnny couldn't carry on him for fear of it flying off at high speed. When the Liberty League was founded, an aging Rodney decided to retire and instead help manage the production side of the war effort, though Johnny Rocket regularly visited him for advice. Rodney later lent Johnny some of the money he used to open his own garage after the war. He never married and died in relative obscurity. Nobody knows where the Road-Star wound up, not even the original Johnny Rocket or his heir.

      (Rereading the Golden Age, I noticed that the original Johnny Rocket was one of the youngest members, so I thought it would be fun to give him the adult sidekick, ala Stripesy and the Star-Spangled Kid.)

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      • #4
        Re: Golden Age Sidekicks of the Freedom-verse!

        The Sons of Liberty
        Sam, Benny, Herc, Pat, and Paulie were a group of poor children from Boston. They latched onto one another early on, with Sam serving as the gang's makeshift leader. They often got into trouble and ran small scams, but one day they found themselves involved with real time mobsters. These mobsters, in turn, were working with foreign spies, and the whole operation was busted by the Patriot, who stumbled across the terrified kids hiding away in the villains' base. The Patriot decided to take the kids under his wing, and they took to him quickly. Soon, they had reorganized themselves as the Sons of Liberty, a so-called "junior volunteer legion." The Patriot tried to keep them away from real danger, but while they had no powers, the kids were quick thinking and good scrappers. All five would try to lie about their age and enlist in the Army, but only Pat and Paulie did so successfully, and the two both perished in D-Day, serving bravely. Sam and Benny had a falling out, though they and Herc remained close with the Patriot. The remaining three boys would manage to enlist later on in the war, catching the tail end of the conflict. Sam vanished afterwards, tired of fighting, but Benny and Herc managed to continue working with the Patriot, and became some of the earliest AEGIS agents, serving with distinction.

        The Sons of Liberty had no real costumes, just simple domino masks that they put on when "on a mission." This was more a formality than any real way to hide their identity. In fact, their identities were more safeguarded by the fact that they were relatively anonymous street kids.

        (A take on the Newsboy Legion, though I may revisit this and try to work in a Bucky type too.)

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        • #5
          Re: Golden Age Sidekicks of the Freedom-verse!

          Dicky Doohickey

          Richard Dewey Hickman was a bright boy. At age 5, he had improved the range of the family's radio so that their meager farm in Freedom City could listen to stations all the way from California. And he didn't stop there. At age 8, he decided to put his scientific know-how to work, helping the Freedom City police department with his inventions (whether they wanted to or not). While he was never an official sidekick to any of Freedom City's mystery men, he did help some of the other young heroes from time-to-time, and they were glad of the assistance (not to mention riding in Dicky's slick Justice Jalopy!).

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          • #6
            Re: Golden Age Sidekicks of the Freedom-verse!

            Lookout
            Marshall "Marshie" Corr was mocked by his fellow children for his oversized spectacles. Little did they realize he wore them not because his vision was unusually poor, but rather that it was so precise that it was almost overwhelming! A biological fluke, not quite a mutant power, but close, Marshall's eyes were highly perceptive, particularly at distance and in the dark. Eager to do good, he made a habit of sitting on rooftops, watching for crimes or disasters in progress, and then calling them into police. He eventually crossed paths with the Nightwatchman, and became the vigilante's sidekick, and later a member of the Victory Squadron. Trained by his mentor, Marshall was a solid addition to the team, and made several attempts to serve as the second Nightwatchman after the original passed away, though Emerald City's low post-war crime rate proved this to be practically unnecessary.

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