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  • The Rules of Supervillainy-verse

    Hey folks,

    Thanks to the suggestion of Libra, I've decided to do a thread dedicated to the world of my newly released novel, The Rules of Supervillainy, which is the first book in a series dedicated to everything I love in comic books. If you're interested in a short-breakdown about what the world is like, you can check out its TVtropes.org page (here) or purchase the book (here) or just read the thread.

    Hopefully, you'll feel like doing all three if it intrigues you.


    The Rules of Supervillainy "verse" was inspired by my brief attempts to do a adaptation of my Halt Evil Doer! universe before I dediced that it wasn't quite jelling for what I wanted to accomplish. Instead, I created a wholly original superhero universe which I think is as good as anything else I've made if not better.

    Too many superhero universes in literature tend to be Deconstructive or trying too hard to be serious and DEEP. They forget the simple joy of a world where people can fly, shoot eyebeams, or punch a guy through walls. The series centers around an antihero supervillain but, in many ways, is meant to be a rebuttal to those darker takes on the genre.

    The world is weird, madcap, and above all fun.

    I hope.

    Take note, while this is a thread I've created to share the setting, it's one I'm happy to invite everyone to participate in. It's not going to be one where I mine you for future plot hooks (hehe), but one I hope will go in its own direction. I'll hope you'll find it inspiring to incorporate elements to your games or just enjoy reading.

    Now with all that pretension out of the way, it's time to get started.

    Articles

    The Golden Age
    The Silver Age
    The Atlantean Wars
    The Rust Age
    The Modern Age
    Creeds
    The Culture of Supervillains
    Famous Supervillain Groups
    Ultragod
    Mood and Theme **HIGHLY RECOMMENDED**
    Tom Terror
    New Angeles
    Magic in the Rules-verse
    The Nightwalker
    Merciless: The Supervillain Without MercyTM
    Red Riding Hood
    Diabloman
    The Kingmaker
    The Secret History of PHANTOM
    The Society of Superheroes
    Cold Warrior
    The Brotherhood of Infamy

    Last edited by Charles Phipps; 01-14-2016, 07:53 PM.
    [b]The United Federation of Charles[/b]: [url]http://unitedfederationofcharles.blogspot.com/[/url]
    [b]Twitter[/b]: Charles Phipps@Willowhugger

  • #2
    Re: The Rules of Supervillainy-verse

    Will be buying for kindle at the end of June for my plane flight out east.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: The Rules of Supervillainy-verse

      Earth-M

      The Golden Age

      Earth-M has been dealing with superheroes for the better part of eighty years and this has left a gross and inspiring mark on the public consciousness. Previously, the conflicts between good and evil had been resolved by secret societies fighting each other with magic and proxies. Whole nations engulfed in war thanks to the machinations of secret cabals as well as the whims of alien gods working behind the scenes. Lovecraftian cults, Hermetic secret orders, religious fanatics, and more all existed with the belief the world was a terrifying place which the public absolutely could not know the TruthTM of.

      Then Ultragod arrived.

      African American Astronomer Moses Anders was not the first individual to gain superpowers when he found the meteorite containing the last of the energy-based Ultronians (not actually named that) but he was the first to refuse the offers of the countless groups which did their best to keep the public shrouded in ignorance. He was also strong enough to deal with their assassinations and spells.

      The problem was that if he announced himself to the public, he was likely to be dissected or killed. The world wasn't ready for super-powerful humans because the superpowerful had made it that way. However, looking over at what was happening in the Deep South and Germany, Moses decided that someone needed to make a STATEMENT about what being super REALLY WAS.
      How did one do that, though, without terrifying people?

      He then looked over at his nephew's comic books nearby and saw a new one starring a man in a cape.

      And got an idea.

      Moses' refuge in audacity RUINED the plans of millennium old organizations as countless supers came out in quick succession in brightly colored costumes, sporting codenames, and fighting for JUSTICE rather than esoteric ends. The cabals retaliated and propped up countless criminals, thugs, and monsters with powers they woefully didn't deserve--unknowingly giving the public exactly what they needed to BELIEVE heroes were necessary.

      Then Ultragod took down Stalin and Hitler.

      And....for once....a world shaking use of superhuman power didn't backfire.

      Needless to say, taking down the heads of state for two major powers would never have worked without the covert support of other powers and had MASSIVE consequences for the world--not all positive.
      It didn't prevent World War 2. An evil organization called PHANTOM (formerly formed to fight Nazis) propped up the Reich for its own fascist ends but it was a far less bloody affair with a lot less horrors. Unfortunately, it lasted long too as PHANTOM managed to drag it out to 1946 using supertechnology supplied by the Thran. The Cold War still happened began, maybe just maybe, it wasn't quite so freezing. Its leaders, Tom Terror, Baroness Blitz, and The Phantom Leader, cooperated with numerous other ex-Cabal members who believed that they should seize the sudden publicity of superheroes to force their own ideas of social change onto the world.

      In truth, they had no interests in the Nazis winning but simply used the Reich as a massive piggy bank for their own research as well as investigations into the supernatural. Countless other secret-society members were murdered, vaults of ancient technology plundered, and fortunes seized to prepare for plans which would take centuries to fulfill.

      The Society of Superheroes was born during this time. Folk like Guinevere, The Golden Lightning, The Nightwalker, American Commando, and others joined together with him. Some of them being every bit as golden as Ultragod while others having dark and malevolent pasts they were (unknown to the public) trying to atone for.

      A shining example of what Supers should aspire to be.

      Too bad things wouldn't last but it was brightest before the Sunset.
      Last edited by Charles Phipps; 12-12-2015, 05:48 AM.
      [b]The United Federation of Charles[/b]: [url]http://unitedfederationofcharles.blogspot.com/[/url]
      [b]Twitter[/b]: Charles Phipps@Willowhugger

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      • #4
        Re: The Rules of Supervillainy-verse

        Originally posted by Phrozen View Post
        Will be buying for kindle at the end of June for my plane flight out east.
        Awesome, I hope you enjoy it.
        [b]The United Federation of Charles[/b]: [url]http://unitedfederationofcharles.blogspot.com/[/url]
        [b]Twitter[/b]: Charles Phipps@Willowhugger

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        • #5
          Re: The Rules of Supervillainy-verse

          The Silver Age

          The Silver Age is something of a misnomer for on Earth-M, it was a time period which isn't quite what we think of when people say that. On a basic level, it's important to remember that while superheroes were ADOPTING the tropes of comic book heroes, there was no Comics Code Authority looking over their shoulder in real life or magical force guiding them to a happy ending (unless you bartered with a hyperdimensional entity for it).

          As such, the Sixties through late Seventies were a time of great social upheaval which reflected itself in the Silver Age (basically the Bronze Age and Silver Age were never really distinct unlike in our world) as well as its heroes.

          Ultragod and Guinevere wished to establish a kind of apolitcal Camelot which would fight social injustice as well as work to improve the world as a whole. On a very basic level, they wanted to be forces for societal change and it would hard not to be when you were the world's most powerful black man and a woman most people considered to be part-alien. Ultragod had, to be blunt, a rather goofy idea of what superheroes were and resented when people attempted to make them more "realistic" about what they should be doing.

          Presidents John and later Robert Kennedy embraced Ultragod and the Society of Superheroes amidst political scandals left and right. Unfortunately, even they couldn't protect the Society from its own schisms and public backlash with Ultragod's own beliefs in reaching across the Iron Curtain (which he found himself not at all respected, liked, or what he expected).

          The Society of Superheroes split into multiple groups based on idealogy with those superheroes who put their countries first forming groups like TRUTH and The American Way. Others simply believed lethal force should and could be justified, especially for those who weren't bullet-proof (which led them to either become outlaws or work much-much closer with authorities than Ultragod was comfortable with).

          The Society also faced reprisals from those who didn't think they were radical enough in their desire for social change as well as government anti-superhero task forces. J. Edgar Hoover proved one of the most tireless enemies of superheroes, recruiting numerous ones into the FBI even as he used them to spy on other members of their groups or as weapons. Ultragod, himself, suffered a scandal when it was revealed he was married to a white (actually Hispanic, but racists are stupid) woman named Polly Pratchett that drew ire from both sides of the racial divide. Anything which remotely smacked of scandal was used and the smear campaigns turned people against them for a time for more glamorous (if less colorful) government agents.

          It also became known that superheroes would NOT fight in war during The Second Vietnam War after the disastrous death of every single member of the Truth, Justice, and America First combined initiative. Tom Terror had resurrected P.H.A.N.T.O.M with an army of genetically enhanced soldiers who seemed to come from nowhere. Ultragod was able to stop him from taking over much of East Asia but the hundreds of thousands killed during the conflict and need for both American, Chinese, European, and Soviet forces to drive him back took away much of the allure (as did the massive collateral from superheroes less talented in their power's use than the Society's--wrongly blamed on them).

          Why Vietnam 2? Aside from the ability to say, "This is an alternate reality where STUFF IS DIFFERENT" it also fits with kind of showing that if you solve the first one Doctor Manhattan-style, you actually haven't resolved any of the tensions thereof. Of course, this war was kind of overshadowed by SUPERHUMAN TERRORISTS but needless to say any gains made by the United States in the first war were obliterated in the aftermath.

          I also hate how these big epic conflicts can exist in comics and no one thinks to record them as a noteworthy historical event.
          Ultragod attempted to salvage his situation by using his great knowledge of the world's greatest minds as well as enhanced intellect to help construct "The City of the Future" in Atlas City. Converting his hometown in Florida into a massive technological paradise of the kind Walt Disney would have envied. Unfortunately, similar efforts did not work elsewhere as the Nightwalker's home city of Falconcrest became an infamous occult-crime-ridden hellhole as it seemed his presence made things worse than better. Los Angeles benefited from the efforts of the Lightning Clan and their adopted oddballs but not so much as to really see them as anything other than curious oddities.

          The Cape Wars were the end of the Silver Age as government supers cracked down on anything outside their purview and numeorus battles between superheroes left whole city-blocks leveled (thankfully, mostly evacuated) as supervillains did less damage than the various kinds of heroes.

          It seemed Ultragod's dream was dead.

          Then aliens invaded.
          Last edited by Charles Phipps; 06-12-2015, 09:23 PM.
          [b]The United Federation of Charles[/b]: [url]http://unitedfederationofcharles.blogspot.com/[/url]
          [b]Twitter[/b]: Charles Phipps@Willowhugger

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          • #6
            Re: The Rules of Supervillainy-verse

            The Atlantean Wars

            Aliens is perhaps a misnomer as the Atlanteans weren't actually aliens. They were, in fact, human beings hailing from an alternate universe (Earth-N) where an asteroid had struck the Earth and caused massive flooding across the planet. The human race survived, barely, and eventually grew technologically advanced with a radically different culture. Combining elements of Norse mythology with the sea deities of many culture, they also had a singular monolithic expansionist culture.

            One which looked for new vistas once the Atlantean Empire finished conquering their world.

            From the perspective of the people on Earth, The Atlantean Wars were a series of crossover events and comic book-style punch outs which seemed separate but were actually part of the same interdimensional invasion. No one knows, to this day, how many people died in the fight since so much of it remains classified. However, superheroes ended up finding themselves forced to band together whether they liked to or not.

            With no one else able to unite them, the Society of Superheroes absorbed all but a handfull of teen-based teams and died-hard iconoclasts before pushing the Atlanteans and their Merrow citizens back. Even so, it was a "victory" in name only due to the fact massive sections of underwater territory below a certain depth was ceded to the Atalnteans who began constructing domed colonies en masse.

            A larger consequece of the invasion was the Earth being showered with mutagenic bacteria by Doctor Hyperstorm in hopes of creating a super-race to repulse the evil invaders. It had almost no effect on the Invaders but caused countless "Natural Supers" to start to be born across the world, oftentimes with disfiguring or uncontrollable powers.

            Even worse was the rise of Neo-Supervillains. Supervillainy had never really been a THING until the invasion as superpowered criminals existed and were often fought but never in vast numbers and often were nothing more than nuances. The Atlantean Invasion left vast amounts of alien technology a century ahead of the rest of the world scattered across the land with many also believing the Foundation conducted secret experiments on criminals to create cannon-fodder weapons.

            Ironically, this latter strategy worked and the supervillains who fought against the Atlanteans won themselves massive gains in the war as well as public prestige (while also permanently souring many Atlanteans gainst Earth forever). Post-Wars, many used their new abilities to change the eb and flow of criminality forever as supervillains were now "cool" and too powerful for police to stop. They also outnumbered normal heroes by a factor of ten to one (the government REALLY going overboard while others like PHANTOM and SKULL copied the research for their own use).

            Much of the economy collapsed toward the end of the Eighties and triggered a world very much like the dark and gritty nineties of the Iron Age. Even as Los Angeles was rebuilt as New Angeles following the invasions damage to the city with superhero help, the world would change forever.
            [b]The United Federation of Charles[/b]: [url]http://unitedfederationofcharles.blogspot.com/[/url]
            [b]Twitter[/b]: Charles Phipps@Willowhugger

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            • #7
              Re: The Rules of Supervillainy-verse

              The Rust Age

              The Iron Age equivalent of Earth-M was not akin to other settings in that it was full of a decline of heroic seeming superheroes. On the contrary, it was much more akin to Kingdom Come by Alex Ross and Mark Waid. The Society of Superheroes was never at its most powerful and respected during 1990 to 2010 but those twenty years were an autocracy where their efforts were against a situation they were often ice-skating uphill for.

              The Society of Superheroes devoted its efforts to putting out fires across the globe and rebuilding the damage from the Atlantean Invasion. They, unfortunately, found themselves almost immediately overwhelmed by the fact that the interdimensional technology they acquired from Earth-N attracted the attention of numerous OTHER hyper-dimensional powers. Tsavong, Thran, Venusians (from an alternate Venus colonized by Superman-powered humans), and Entropicus the Tyrant at the End of Time.

              Not all of the encounters with alien powers were hostile, quite the contrary, many people had seen Earth's superheroes in action and wanted their HELP. This led to an uncomfortable position where the Society of Superheroes were frequently off-planet and helpless to do anything about a major crisis left to less prepared heroes.

              This wouldn't be useful to Gamemasters at all!
              The heroes left behind were vulnerable too with folk like The Guitarist killed by a newer, meaner breed of supervillain who seemed every bit as capable as superheroes and just as dedicated. People were growing up WANTING to be supervillains now and were as dedicated to that lifestyle as superheroes seemed to be to there's, either out of greed or simple disillusionment with the system. The Old Cabals, now almost spent, were no longer there to indoctrinate many into their viewpoints and thus people were left to the temptations of power on their own.

              They chose...poorly.

              Androidman was sworn in as the 42nd President of the United States in this wave of superhero nostalgia and optimism even as the rest of the country was on the verge of bankruptcy due to the inability to cope with changing economic markets from technological change as well as instability caused across the globe by superhumans. John Mann, as he had named himself, made several questionable decisions during his term which would haunt future generations even as they provided temporary relief.

              The first of these decisions was to more or less end monopoly laws and create numerous economic protections for multinationals, creating the rise of OCP and Weyland-Yutani-like megacorporations. They exist in our world today so you shouldn't be surprised but groups like Omega Corporations, Global Media, and Green Food Inc. wield disproportionate power across the planet even as compared to us. The economic disparity and rise of violent crime, leading to the need for more superheroes, is everywhere as a result. The system functions but it doesn't function well.

              The second was a well-intentioned but attempt to protect the right of emergent Supers by banning any extraordinary means against them, methods which have been upheld by the Supreme Court. As a result, many supervillains ran ragged around Law Enforcement and a rise of a new kind of superhero, The Anti-Hero (yes, that's actually what they called themselevs) emerged. Anti-heroes like Shoot-Em-Up, The Extreme, and The Butcherman won great public support despite many being identical to supervillains themselves. And, if you think this is because the public was fed up with them, note that this was also when "supervillain chic" was at the height of its popularity.

              Ironically, the most prominent superhero during this time was Ultragoddes who was the child of Polly Pratchett and Ultragod and America's darling for much of her youth. To this day, she is still considered one of the most wholesome and beloved heroes alive. The fact she became much harder and more ruthless than most SOS heroes due to being left behind during the SOS' missions to deal with the problems on Earth was lost on the public.
              [b]The United Federation of Charles[/b]: [url]http://unitedfederationofcharles.blogspot.com/[/url]
              [b]Twitter[/b]: Charles Phipps@Willowhugger

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              • #8
                Re: The Rules of Supervillainy-verse

                The Modern Age a.k.a The New Order

                The present situation on Earth-M is an unstable one as the planet is full of countless supervillains ranging in various levels from the psychotic to the anti-villainous. The economic situation is very tenuous and there's a rising trend of authoritarianism to deal with the messy situation on Earth. Basically, in short, this is the end or the beginning of the Superhero Era. Either the system founded by Ultragod will collapse on itself and the governments will launch a brutal crackdown of superhumans and supervillains which will end with their destruction (or the government's), or the superheroes will rally together to defeat the Neo-Supervillains to bring peace to the world.

                It's not a sustainable situation.

                One will rise, the others will fall.

                Unfortunately, for the superheroes. the situation for them is stacked against them. They are under attack and don't even realize it. The remnants of the cabals of old: The Brotherhood of Infamy, The Emerald Sign, The Black Order of Apophis-Thule, and the Inner Council of PHANTOM have decided that they will not attempt to engage the superheroes directly.

                No, they will simply spite their world like Satan spiting God's creation until they wear themselves down.

                Or the public turns against them.

                Assisting them, however unwittingly, is President John Omega who is the Obviously Evil Kennedy look-alike who suddenly stole the election from
                President Obama in the previous election, only to proceed to launch a cult-of-personality-fueled attempt to pressure the world to the point it explodes. John Omega is nothing more than a puppet for Entropicus blessed with mundane but still superhuman charisma and the unique ability to know what people want to hear before they say it. Despite being a (minor) Super himself, he has made his campaign on reversing all the protections they have enjoyed as well as militarizing society to "take back the world."

                He believes Entropicus will leave the Earth to him when he's done dismantling the Society of Superheroes.

                He's wrong.

                A new breed of anti-heroes and anti-villains have also emerged in the shadow of the Society's absolute (but inflexible) sense of good. People who may be ruthless or criminal but aren't necessarily EVIL and are disgusted by the behavior of the worst. The Society persecutes them like any other criminal, if not worse, because they do not want to muddy the waters of good but these would-be Punishers and X-Forces may be the best hope they have of turning the tide.

                Especially since sometimes you really do need Wolverine.
                [b]The United Federation of Charles[/b]: [url]http://unitedfederationofcharles.blogspot.com/[/url]
                [b]Twitter[/b]: Charles Phipps@Willowhugger

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                • #9
                  Re: The Rules of Supervillainy-verse

                  Creeds

                  Because the one thing which Mutants and Masterminds needed from Dungeons and Dragons was alignments. In truth, there's something to be said about in the world of Earth-M because they have something called "Creeds" which plays an extensive role even if it's not a literal setting element.

                  Hero Creeds

                  Superhero

                  Those who follow the Superhero Creed are individuals who pledge to follow Ultragod and the Society of Superheroes' example. Superhero creed followers are individuals who live to serve the greater good above all else and avoid killing whenever possible. They hold themselves to an exceptionally high standard of morality, personal or otherwise, which they follow religiously.

                  Amusingly, most superheroes tend to be vaguely anti-establishment or pro-independent due to the cynicism of established powers with those who folow "My Country, Right or Wrong" attitudes being more like anti-heroes. The Superhero Creed can be overly demanding, however, and result in people becoming Fallen Heroes. Note: Unlike the proper silver age, even superheroes can kill as an absolute last resort or in self-defense or the defense of an innocent but this is viewed as a personal failings.

                  Examples: Ultragod, Guinevere, The Nightwalker, The Silver Lightning, Prismatic Commando, Sunlight

                  Anti-Hero

                  Anti-Heroes are those superheroes who reject Ultragod's code and the Society of Superheroes' morality for whatever reason. They do not attempt be "superheroes" as often as soldiers who just happen to have superpowers or wear costumes. Anti-heroes do not have a problem with killing, though most exercise some sort of code as to what sort of target they follow. Anti-Heroes often have close relationship with a sponsor of one sort or another, be it megacorporation or government to make up for their lack of resources from the SOS. Quite a few work for the Foundation, which is considerably laxer about killing.

                  Example: Ultragoddess, the Shadow Seven, Robin Hood, Maid Marian, The Trenchcoat Magician, Aquarius (yes, the dictator of the Merrow)

                  Fallen Heroes

                  Fallen Heroes are individuals who have abandoned themselves to an ends justify the means mentality or a Tautological Templar attitude. In short, they are heroes, and everyone who opposes them is a villain. Fallen Heroes can and often do have significant public support if they're careful, even as they tend to have a very high tolerance for "collateral damage." The image of the Hulk smashing through buildings in super-hero fights, machine gun fire in the middle of downtown, and cold-blooded executions of a particularly grizzly sort (versus a bullet to the head for the worst of the worst or in combat) are common practices. The line between Fallen Heroes and Supervillain is often very thin but the former tend to be worse.

                  Example: The Extreme, Shoot-Em-Up, The Butcherman, The Exsanguinator, The Truth, The All-American.

                  Villain Creeds

                  Supervillain

                  Villains are, bluntly, those individuals who have adopted something similar to Tom Terror's Manifesto or Mister Chaos's Black Speech. Supervillains are those individuals who, due to either their powers or attitudes, simply have decided they no longer have to ovey any laws or mores if they don't want to. Most supervillains are motivated by relatively mundane concepts like money, power, sex, or fame. The culture of Earth-M is toxic that many supervillains can and do live like kings either in prison or not despite their identities being public. There are many non-extradition countries which treat them as honored guests in exchange for benefits and areas where police are simply terrified of them.

                  Life can be very profitable if you're out for yourself. One thing, though, is most supervillains have RULES which have emerged to an extent of the fact most aren't pure evil. These Rules of Supervillainy tend to be more pragmatic than moral but prevent the worst atrocities from occurring. Most supervillains are, for example, aware killing civilians by the truckload or police or heroes means they're less likely to be taken alive. The latter less because the SOS will murder them then Anti-Heroes and even regular superheroes will drop everything to smack them down and bring them in.

                  Examples: The Typewriter, Diabloman, Red Riding Hood, Big Ben, Sovi-Ape, The Mastermind, Mister and Mrs. Chillingsworth,

                  Anti-Villain

                  Anti-Villains are sort of an odd bird in that they're individuals who have decided to live outside the law and are frequently criminals but hold themselves to a much higher moral standard than most of their kind. They tend to avoid killing civilians even if it causes personal inconveinance or even endangering them. They also tend to take moral stands against Monsters when they meet them, even if it involves just putting them down. Many also have causes they support with their criminal activity be it the environment, family, or social overthrow. They're still considered supervillains by both their fellow criminals as well as superheroes, though, even if their efforts have contributed to a lot of the "supervillain chic" which is making so many problems for heroes today.

                  Examples: Merciless, The Black Witch a.k.a Selene Darkchylde, General Venom (no, not that one), and the Human Tank

                  Monster

                  Monsters are, simply put, that. They are the individuals who do not just follow a doctrine of absolute selfishness but are actively EVIL, even to the point of going out to do it for more than just personal gain. They are a collection of sadists, murderers, fanatics, terrorists, supernatural entities, and literal worshipers of evil. Monsters do not follow any rules of supervillainy and either have such power as to avoid any form of consequence for their actions or they live fast before dying young. Monsters are the primary reason Anti-Heroes exist in vast numbers since the Society of Superheroes' mercy toward them is viewed as weakness. That actual serial killers and worse can get protections as well as fame from putting on a costume makes the situation all the more messed up. Thankfully, while Supervillains will reluctantly work them, both Anti-Heroes as well as Anti-Villains show no hesitation at killing them.
                  Amusingly, both Mister Chaos and Tom Terror have long since fallen to this state but successfully masquerade Supervillains.

                  Examples: Psychoslinger, The Ice Cream Man, Tom Terror, Mister Chaos, Entropicus, The Brotherhood of Infamy, Pyronnus the World Destroyer
                  [b]The United Federation of Charles[/b]: [url]http://unitedfederationofcharles.blogspot.com/[/url]
                  [b]Twitter[/b]: Charles Phipps@Willowhugger

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: The Rules of Supervillainy-verse

                    I know just what you mean about Creeds, Charles.

                    My own setting (see my sig below) has Traditions, which are the unwritten rules that most human supers (and those trying to pass for human) follow for either ethical ("We must have standards in our line of work.") or pragmatic ("If I break them, no-one's going to work with me again.") reasons, regardless of if they see themselves as a hero or villain.

                    And there are also Codes, which are more of a personal matter but taken very seriously by those who have them.

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                    • #11
                      Re: The Rules of Supervillainy-verse

                      A most excellent start Charles - I shall do my best to add something to this fine assemblage of information just as soon as you suggest to me some topic you would be especially keen on seeing my thoughts about!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: The Rules of Supervillainy-verse

                        Originally posted by Libra1010 View Post
                        A most excellent start Charles - I shall do my best to add something to this fine assemblage of information just as soon as you suggest to me some topic you would be especially keen on seeing my thoughts about!
                        Would you like to introduce us to New Angeles?



                        Or perhaps the Lightning family?
                        [b]The United Federation of Charles[/b]: [url]http://unitedfederationofcharles.blogspot.com/[/url]
                        [b]Twitter[/b]: Charles Phipps@Willowhugger

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                        • #13
                          Re: The Rules of Supervillainy-verse

                          Originally posted by betterwatchit View Post
                          I know just what you mean about Creeds, Charles.

                          My own setting (see my sig below) has Traditions, which are the unwritten rules that most human supers (and those trying to pass for human) follow for either ethical ("We must have standards in our line of work.") or pragmatic ("If I break them, no-one's going to work with me again.") reasons, regardless of if they see themselves as a hero or villain.

                          And there are also Codes, which are more of a personal matter but taken very seriously by those who have them.
                          I like those a great deal! Good job.

                          On my end, I always like "City of Heroes" and how you could play with expansions both not-so-bad villains and very-bad heroes.

                          Showing a bigger spectrum seemed like a great thing to do in the book and the game setting adaptation seemed like it would need that to reflect the world's peculiar morality.
                          [b]The United Federation of Charles[/b]: [url]http://unitedfederationofcharles.blogspot.com/[/url]
                          [b]Twitter[/b]: Charles Phipps@Willowhugger

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                          • #14
                            Re: The Rules of Supervillainy-verse

                            Oh I definitely subscribing to this thread.

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                            • #15
                              Re: The Rules of Supervillainy-verse

                              Supervillain Chic or "The Culture of Supervillains"

                              "As far back as I can remember, I always wanted to be a supervillain."
                              -Henry Hill, Goodfellas (Earth M version).

                              One of the biggest failings of Earth-M is the fact that the world has gotten bad enough that people admire the villains almost as much as they admire the heroes. Just as there's enthusiasts for the mafia in real-life with media all about their families, codes, and "Do not do this cool thing" there is a similar effect with supervillains on Earth-M. There's video games, supervillain rap, Oscar-winning movies, and television shows about their spouses.

                              How this came about is an interesting thing to speculate about and is probably a combination of multiple factors: distress over the government, the illicit thrill one gets from rulebreakers, the charismatic nature of numerous supervillains, and the simple fact everyone tends to think being the bad guy is cooler than being the one who stops them.

                              There's less sociological reasons and more "social engineering" reasons for this as well with Omega Corporation being secret servants of an alien Wizard God at the end of the universe, P.H.A.N.T.O.M and the Brotherhood of Infamy supporting their own candidates whenever possible, plus the fact anyone who actually wants to be a criminal is usually not quite restrained enough to not dream of making it into the "big leagues."

                              The reality of supervillainy is, of course, that it tends to be quite a bit less glamourous than most people imagine. For every supervillain that manages to make it, the vast majority have a career which consists of a silly costume before getting sent up the river to prison. The thing is, this is actually where most supervillains get their "real" start as there is nowhere better for groups like P.H.A.N.T.O.M, SKULL, or the Brotherhood to find ready and willing people to listen to their spiels.

                              The American criminal underworld is quite a bit more cosmopolitan in this world as well with the mafia, mafiya, New Angeles gangs, and other groups willing to hire Soldiers to fight their wars for them even if they tend not to make them actual gang members. This has lead, of course, to many forming their own mult-iethnic theme gangs of the kind which previously only existed on television. In an attempt to imitate comic book's excesses, they've actually made groups like the Jokerz and Freeze Gangs.

                              The thing is, though, that life as a supervillain is also nasty, brutish, and short (like Warhammer dwarves) if you're not careful. While superheroes tend to just send you back to prison, you're much more likely to be killed by one of your fellows than an anti-hero. The "Rules" of Supervillainy restrict killing of cops and superheroes (which, being more like guildelines, happens anyway--especially if you can do it without your usual theatrical flair or blame it on henchmen) but have no such protections for each other. Supervillains often war for profit, betray each other, fight for territory, and can even engage in battles for silly things like a codename or costume type.

                              What is true, nevertheless, is there's a veritable army of potential candidates to take up the mantle of any fallen supervillain plus a thriving support network for people who dream of being the next Mad Wizard or Crime King. Expansive black markets exist both on the internet and in most major cities for selling devices or (low-powered) magic to those who want to be part of the scene. They also fence just about anything if you're willing to hit the right sort of targets (including other criminals).
                              Last edited by Charles Phipps; 06-13-2015, 05:20 PM.
                              [b]The United Federation of Charles[/b]: [url]http://unitedfederationofcharles.blogspot.com/[/url]
                              [b]Twitter[/b]: Charles Phipps@Willowhugger

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