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Fire power, feature or tech?

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  • Fire power, feature or tech?

    Would making fire different colors count as a feature, power or the result of technology?

  • #2
    Feature.
    Powers do important stuff.
    Technology is descriptor. Descriptors describe things, they don't do things at all.

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    • #3
      Jmucchiello is right, but Iím going to throw some caveats out there because iím a bit bored...

      If weíre dealing with someone who can change the colour of existing fires, then we have a Feature. The character is making a change to something external but not in any way that is going to be particularly useful so a one point Feature works.

      Then letís imagine we have Hot Stuff, a 1970s disco inspired drag queen diva who generates multicoloured fire in her pursuit of fierce and fabulous justice. The multicoloured fire is just a descriptor. Sheís not affecting anything external to her own powers with the colour change and it doesnít add anything to the base effect.

      if on the other hand she can use that coloured flame to generate a minor effect such as emulating the Facinate Advantage then we have a Feature again.

      if Hot Stuffís Disco Inferno power (Iím probably halfway to building this character now that Iíve even named the power) is generated using her Divalicious Disco Dress rather than being generated internally then itís a function of a Device.

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      • #4
        As a side note, there's also Variable Descriptor, which might be used if the character always has the Fire descriptor, but can modify it within a reasonably limited setup. Maybe they can manifest Hellfire, Holy Fire, Cold Flame, etc. Just note that whenever there are multiple descriptors, the general rule is that they all apply. Immunity to one is immunity to all, and Vulnerability to one is Vulnerability to all. This can lead to some weird situations, like someone with Cold Flame being unable to do damage to either the flame guy (who's immune to Fire Effects) or the ice gal (who's immune to Cold effects), but it's somewhat countered by

        As a GM (and occasionally as a player asking this of a GM), I think it's also reasonable to agree to a particular split. For example, my character of The Flaming Dwarf (part of a set of builds from a random generator challenge) was a muscular short guy in a flame suit, so of his 12 damage ranks when punching someone, 6 were Physical/Bludgeoning and 6 were Energy/Fire. So when he came up against Firebug, who has a flame-proof suit, he still did some physical damage, but not as much. And later, when he encountered an ice villain who had a 50% vulnerability to fire, he only added 3 ranks to the attack, not 6.
        [url=http://roninarmy.com/threads/996]My Builds[/url]

        [b]Current games:[/b]
        [url=http://www.echoesofthemultiverse.com/viewtopic.php?f=15&t=839]The J.V. Team (GM)[/URL]

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        • #5
          What if it effects the environment like a black lightbulb?

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          • #6
            I'd just make that a Feature, personally. Usually just a party trick, but might give a +2 on occasion for Perception or Investigate checks when looking for the right materials.
            [url=http://roninarmy.com/threads/996]My Builds[/url]

            [b]Current games:[/b]
            [url=http://www.echoesofthemultiverse.com/viewtopic.php?f=15&t=839]The J.V. Team (GM)[/URL]

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            • #7
              Originally posted by FuzzyBoots View Post
              I'd just make that a Feature, personally. Usually just a party trick, but might give a +2 on occasion for Perception or Investigate checks when looking for the right materials.
              You could also use it for signaling... different colors shot up into the air to represent different messages.

              It could also just simulate fireworks.

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