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View Full Version : Provoking attacks of opportunity?



noblelegacy
12-07-2014, 12:37 PM
Some of my potential DA RPG players have been wondering whether this system has anything to cover enemies provoking attacks of opportunity, for those of you that are familiar with DnD.

Is there anything to keep enemies from fleeing when you engage them in melee? How about people running through the battlefield crossing multiple enemies as they do? In dnd 3, 4 (and presumably 5) e, these sorts of things would provoke.

Anything like that in here to prevent battle from becoming a free for all?

Darkdreamer
12-07-2014, 12:56 PM
Not really. Like many systems, its prioritised speed and fluidity over dealing with such things. I admit that sort of thing sometimes bugs me too, but its just something I've learned to get over.

Hellebore
12-07-2014, 01:57 PM
Without some form of cost I find reactive actions hard to balance. 5 enemies flee, you get 5 additional attacks.

In the past on certain occasions I've done the following:

Disengage from Combat
Make a Dex (Acrobatics) test vs opponent's Per (Choose a Sense, usually Sight). If you succeed you get away (move action). If you fail you are prevented from getting away and you lose a number of Health points equal to the opponent's Dragon Die.

Giving a risk/reward balances it out somewhat. You also have the opportunity to have a specialisation like Guardian add say Int to the Dragon Die for damage to represent their skill at tying up enemies in melee.

Hellebore

NickMiddleton
12-08-2014, 01:58 AM
Some related discussions on the old forums:

http://roninarmy.com/gr-forum-archive/viewtopic.php?f=33&t=12812&p=119661

http://roninarmy.com/gr-forum-archive/viewtopic.php?f=33&t=10341&p=100012

My opinion is similar to Hellbores - rather than something like D&D's rather broken AoO, I use the old idea of Engaged / Disengaged - if a character is in melee range of a hostile opponent who is aware of them they CANNOT simply move away from that opponent. They are "engaged" and can only become "disengaged" through some special action; what that involves is up to the individual (Hellebore uses an Acrobatics check , I tend to use a Dexterity check with "any appropriate focus"#).

Cheers,


Nick

# I am very much a fan of the idea that "focus" means specific talent and training that enhances your chances, but Focus' are not exclusive to one ability - e.g. analyzing a fencers style whilst watching them fight to work out who trained them is a Cunning (Dueling) check...

OzMills
12-08-2014, 02:04 AM
Without some form of cost I find reactive actions hard to balance. 5 enemies flee, you get 5 additional attacks.

While I don't want to get into debating systems, I just want to clear up a misconception. AOO are generally attributed to DnD, although I wouldn't be suprised if they came before that. DnD handles the "multiple attacks" thing by either just saying you can only make one AOO per round, or having every player have only one "Reaction" action they can do in an entrire round.

So if you make that attack of opportunity, you can't attack the 4 subsequent guys who move before your next turn, and other actions you have that require a reaction (ie there's certain things that allow you to defend another as a reaction) can't trigger as you've already used that resource.

DrawGreeny
12-08-2014, 04:25 AM
While I don't want to get into debating systems, I just want to clear up a misconception. AOO are generally attributed to DnD, although I wouldn't be suprised if they came before that. DnD handles the "multiple attacks" thing by either just saying you can only make one AOO per round, or having every player have only one "Reaction" action they can do in an entrire round.

So if you make that attack of opportunity, you can't attack the 4 subsequent guys who move before your next turn, and other actions you have that require a reaction (ie there's certain things that allow you to defend another as a reaction) can't trigger as you've already used that resource.

That's basically true, although 3rd edition (possibly 4th and/or 5th editions, as well; I'm not really familiar with either) had a feat available that allowed you to make a number of additional opportunity attacks every round, that number being equal to your Dexterity modifier. Granted, that was a specific ability you had to take for your character, which came at the cost of *not* choosing one of the many other abilities available.

Darkdreamer
12-08-2014, 08:32 AM
Zones of control are an old concept, and that's essentially what the engage/disengage thing does. But of course DA (and most RPGs) don't do that out of the box, either. Again, because I suspect for most people it isn't a virtue to constrain movement that way.

I may well houserule it in when I run, though, because honestly, without something like it its way too hard to defend an area properly.

shonuff
12-08-2014, 09:06 AM
I have a HR that establishes zones of control for a set pole-arm wielder with an AoO if you enter. But typically, I allow people to cut and run without any sort of check. It might not be realistic, but mainly I use it for leftover mooks at the end of an encounter.

vonpenguin
12-08-2014, 09:55 AM
If I had to houserule it I would say a minor action to prepare to attack and block anyone that attempts to pass you by, maybe apposed dex (initiative) rolls to see if you manage it and a -2 to the attack roll (stopping would be automatic). Because with a fifteen second round you have to consider that someone moving probably does have the time to disengage semi safely unless the other guy is specifically attempting to not let them move rather than just trying to fight normally.