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Penthau
11-19-2014, 12:14 PM
In D&D 3.x and Pathfinder, the adventuring day will end when characters run low on resources; spells, healing and hit points. In MnM fantasy, what are the things that force an end to pushing forward?

JDRook
11-19-2014, 12:33 PM
Full disclosure, I haven't played any M&M fantasy-style games, but I do know the M&M system doesn't have the same built-in resource limitation as some other systems. Out of combat healing is either rapid or Complication-driven, so hit points aren't an issue, and Effects built into spells are essentially unlimited unless specifically built otherwise. Due to this, I would imagine it would be based more on the narrative line of the story. In theory, PCs could probably push on for days, but the GM would probably require Fatigue checks from anyone not specifically Immune to the needs of sleep or food. Meta-concerns like player energy and outside commitments would be another factor.

In short, it becomes the responsibility of the GM to end the days, not the mechanics of the system.

Darkdreamer
11-19-2014, 06:24 PM
The fact M&M is open-ended on resources for everything but Hero Points is one of the things you have to deal with when you use a tool for a purpose its not designed for.

Kyle
11-19-2014, 06:49 PM
If you really want a mechanical reason to have the characters stop adventuring at some point, you could start imposing circumstance penalties if the characters have been awake too long, or make fights much more difficult at night.

One of the things that always bothered me while playing D&D is having the characters set out on their epic quest at the crack of dawn, and have the first encounter go worse than the GM expected, depleting far more resources than intended, and suddenly the characters are stuck twiddling their thumbs for a full day, because everyone needs to replenish spells and hitpoints. Playing a fantasy game with M&M, that's never going to happen. The characters can continue to progress until a natural stopping point occurs in the narrative.

danelsan
11-19-2014, 06:58 PM
Well, most fantasy adventurers need to eat, to sleep, are not immune to fatigue and so on. Just go with the natural limitations instead of the rules-induced limitation of resources. Alternatively, build powers so that they do run out, either by Flaws or as Complications. The warrior can run out of arrows, the Mage can run out of spells.

Basically, Complications. Weakness due to fatigue and lack of food, lasting conditions from Damage/Affliction, Power Loss in running out of arrows/spells/psi energy/whatever, this sort of stuff is what makes M&M adventurers stop...and gives them some precious Hero Points for when it finally comes the time to face the Dragon/Lich/Beholder/Vampire/Demon/Dark Warlord/ et Cetera.

Penthau
11-19-2014, 08:21 PM
If you really want a mechanical reason to have the characters stop adventuring at some point, you could start imposing circumstance penalties if the characters have been awake too long, or make fights much more difficult at night.

One of the things that always bothered me while playing D&D is having the characters set out on their epic quest at the crack of dawn, and have the first encounter go worse than the GM expected, depleting far more resources than intended, and suddenly the characters are stuck twiddling their thumbs for a full day, because everyone needs to replenish spells and hitpoints. Playing a fantasy game with M&M, that's never going to happen. The characters can continue to progress until a natural stopping point occurs in the narrative.

I don't want a reason, I was wondering if there was something in the system that would cause the characters to have to stop at some point. The 5 min work day is one of the artificial outcomes of vancian casting that I hate, especially when casters go nova in a minor battle just so they have something to do. I would prefer that there wasn't some in game reason that they had to stop and the "real world" reasons like needing to sleep, long term damage or fatigue from battles would be the cause for them to stop. I am in the process of choosing a rules system for a fantasy setting and was looking for something that allowed the characters to heroically push themselves.

digitalangel
11-19-2014, 08:48 PM
Sounds like M&M week work great for you then. What you are taking about is one of the reasons I use it as my main St of mechanics for fantasy as well.

For a fantasy setting where damage is a little grittier and realistic I would suggest 2E over 3E and use the lethal damage rules as well at least for armed opponents. Even without healing or regeneration powers 3E let's players recover much faster which is OK for supers games but a little much in fantasy settings.